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So I have messing around just now and wrote this out:

        int i = 0|1|2|3|4|5|6|7|8|9|10;

        Console.WriteLine(i.ToString());
        Console.Read();

This outputs 15. Why does it output 15? What does the pipe operator do?

Could you give me an example of where this might actually be used.

I understand if this seems like a pointless question.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

It's the bit-wise OR operator

The basic truth table for the OR operator is:

  A  B  A|B
  0  0   0
  0  1   1
  1  0   1
  1  1   1

So to analyze your case 0|1|2|3|4|5|6|7|8|9|10, in binary, that's:

 0 = 0b00000 
 1 = 0b00001 
 2 = 0b00010 
 3 = 0b00011 
 4 = 0b00100 
 5 = 0b00101 
 6 = 0b00110
 7 = 0b00111 
 8 = 0b01000 
 9 = 0b01001 
10 = 0b01010
------------
15 = 0b01111 

Further Reading

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4  
And suddenly it's explained. –  plast1K Apr 2 '13 at 20:44
1  
@Plast1k you could have easily explained this as well LOL –  DJ KRAZE Apr 2 '13 at 20:46
    
I do not believe I could have! I have seen truth tables before, but wasn't really able to apply them in this fashion. This helped immensely. –  plast1K Apr 2 '13 at 20:47
    
I looked at this from something I learned in a Math class for Electronics I took back in the 8th grade over 30+ yrs ago.. lol it's like riding a bike AND OR NOT NOR NAND etc...LOL –  DJ KRAZE Apr 2 '13 at 20:49
    
Definitely confusing stuff, but you're right, it does come back. –  plast1K Apr 2 '13 at 20:50

| is the bitwise OR operator in C# (and many other languages). An OR operation between two bits goes like this:

0 | 0 = 0
1 | 0 = 1
0 | 1 = 1
1 | 1 = 1

so in decimal 1 | 2 becomes 01 | 10 in binary, which results in 11 (3 in decimal), like so:

01
10
--
11

Bitwise OR is a cumulative operation so:

 0 = 00000 
 1 = 00001 
 2 = 00010 
 3 = 00011 
 4 = 00100 
 5 = 00101 
 6 = 00110
 7 = 00111 
 8 = 01000 
 9 = 01001 
10 = 01010
------------
15 = 01111 
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You are taking the bit-wise OR of the binary representation of those numbers. The numbers 0 through 10 in binary look like:

0000
0001
0010
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
1000
1001
1010

If you were to perform an OR of each digit of all of those numbers, you would end up with 1111 - which is 15 in decimal.

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I think an easier way to figure out the number is use the old 8421 method and where ever you see a 1, you add the values for example 1001 = 9 if you wanted 16 it would be 10000 –  DJ KRAZE Apr 2 '13 at 20:51

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