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I have the code shown below that displays 3 markers on a GoogleMap, the locations data is in a JSON object.

The markers are shown correct, but the Listener (addListener) is only working on the last marker and not on the first 2 markers. What is wrong with my code?

I've looked at many examples, just can't see it. :( Thanks for any help!

 (function() {
window.onload = function() {

// Creating a map
var options = {  
  zoom: 3,  
  center: new google.maps.LatLng(37.09, -95.71),       
  mapTypeId: google.maps.MapTypeId.ROADMAP  
};  
var map = new google.maps.Map(document.getElementById('map'), options);  

// Creating a JSON object with weather data
var weatherData = {'weather': [
  {
    'lat': 40.756054,
    'lng': -73.986951 
  },
  {
    'lat': 47.620973, 
    'lng': -122.347276 
  },
  {
    'lat': 37.775206,
    'lng': -122.419209 
  }
]};

var infoWindow = new google.maps.InfoWindow({
  content: 'Hello world'
}); 

// Looping through the weather array in weatherData
for (var i = 0; i < weatherData.weather.length; i++) {

    // creating a variable that will hold the current weather object
    var weather = weatherData.weather[i];

    // Creating marker
    var marker = new google.maps.Marker({
        position: new google.maps.LatLng(weather.lat, weather.lng), 
        map: map
    });  

    google.maps.event.addListener(marker, 'click', function() {
        infoWindow.open(map, marker);
    }); 


}

  }
 })();
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The short answer is that you need to move your code that creates the marker and adds the event listener into its own function. Then in the loop, you call that function for each marker:

(function() {
    window.onload = function() {

        // Creating a map
        var options = {
            zoom: 3,
            center: new google.maps.LatLng( 37.09, -95.71 ),
            mapTypeId: google.maps.MapTypeId.ROADMAP
        };
        var map = new google.maps.Map( document.getElementById('map'), options );

        // Creating an object with weather data
        var weatherData = {
            weather: [
                { lat: 40.756054, lng: -73.986951 },
                { lat: 47.620973, lng: -122.347276 },
                { lat: 37.775206, lng: -122.419209 }
            ]
        };

        var infoWindow = new google.maps.InfoWindow({
            content: 'Hello world'
        });

        // Looping through the weather array in weatherData
        for( var i = 0;  i < weatherData.weather.length;  i++ ) {
            addWeatherMarker( weatherData.weather[i] );
        }

        function addWeatherMarker( weather ) {
            // Creating marker
            var marker = new google.maps.Marker({
                position: new google.maps.LatLng( weather.lat, weather.lng ),
                map: map
            });

            google.maps.event.addListener( marker, 'click', function() {
                infoWindow.open( map, marker );
            });
        }
    }
})();

The reason the original code doesn't work is the use of the marker variable in the loop and the event listener. But there is only a single marker variable in the code, set at the beginning of the loop. So when the click handler is triggered - long after all of the other code has already finished running - the marker variable has the value you set it to the last time through the loop.

The event listeners for the earlier markers don't somehow get their own copies of the marker variable - there is only one marker variable in the entire program.

Moving the code into a function fixes this. Now, each time you call the function, you do create a new marker variable (and a new weather variable too) for each call. So the event listener inside the function gets to use the marker variable for that specific invocation of the function.

For more information, read up on JavaScript closures.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Michael! That did the trick. Also many thanks for your explanation learnt something again today. –  Steven Filipowicz Apr 3 '13 at 6:29

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