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I have a two dimensional data and two dimensional mesh of quadrilaterals describing a domain subdivided into patches. The data is defined at each mesh node. Discontinuities in the data exist at patch boundaries, i.e. data is multiply defined at the same location.

How can I use Python to plot this data with linear interpolation in-between nodes and correct representation of the discontinuous values along each patch face?

Below are three example elements or patches, each with six node values each.

Figure of three example elements or patches, with six node values each.

Node position and value data might be stored in [Kx3x2] array, where K is the number of elements. For example,

x = np.array( [
[ [0.0, 1.0], [0.0, 1.0], [0.0, 1.0]  ],  #element 0
[ [1.0, 2.0], [1.0, 2.0], [1.0, 2.0]  ],  #element 1
[ [2.0, 3.0], [2.0, 3.0], [2.0, 3.0]  ],  #element 2
] )

y = np.array( [
[ [0.0, 0.0], [0.5, 0.5], [1.0, 1.0]  ],  #element 0
[ [0.0, 1.0], [0.5, 1.5], [1.0, 2.0]  ],  #element 1
[ [1.0, 1.0], [1.5, 1.5], [2.0, 2.0]  ],  #element 2
] )

z = np.array( [
[ [0.0, 0.5], [0.0, 0.8], [0.0, 1.0]  ],  #element 0
[ [0.3, 1.0], [0.6, 1.2], [0.8, 1.3]  ],  #element 1
[ [1.2, 1.5], [1.3, 1.4], [1.5, 1.7]  ],  #element 2
] )

I have considered pyplot.imshow(). This is not able consider the whole domain all at once and still represent the multiply-valued discontinuous nodes. It might work to call imshow() separately for each patch. But, how would I draw each patch image on the same axis? imshow() is also problematic for non-rectangular patches, which is my general case.

I have considered pyplot.pcolormesh(), but it seems to work exclusively with cell-centered data.

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Could you do something like imshowing your data as an RGBA array, with the alpha channel set to 0 wherever your data is underfined? –  ali_m Apr 2 '13 at 21:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One option works through triangulation of all the elements and then plotting using the matplotlib tripcolor() function I have now discovered. Two useful demos are here and here.

Auto-triangulation of my global domain can be problematic, but Delaunay triangulation of a single quadrilateral works very well: triangulation displayed for just the center element

I create a global triangulation by appending the triangulation of each element. This means shared nodes are actually duplicated in the position arrays and value arrays. This allows for the discontinuous data at element faces. triangulation displayed for all elements

Drawing with linear interpolation and discontinuities as desired can be achieved with the tripcolor() function, supplying the node locations, and values for each node. final solution pcolor

I was a little concerned how contour plotting might work, since element faces are no longer logically connected. tricontour() still works as expected. (shown here with triangulation overlaid) contour plot with triangulation overlaid

Reproduced with the following code:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.tri as tri

x = np.array( [
[ [0.0, 1.0], [0.0, 1.0], [0.0, 1.0]  ],  #element 0
[ [1.0, 2.0], [1.0, 2.0], [1.0, 2.0]  ],  #element 1
[ [2.0, 3.0], [2.0, 3.0], [2.0, 3.0]  ],  #element 2
] )

y = np.array( [
[ [0.0, 0.0], [0.5, 0.5], [1.0, 1.0]  ],  #element 0
[ [0.0, 1.0], [0.5, 1.5], [1.0, 2.0]  ],  #element 1
[ [1.0, 1.0], [1.5, 1.5], [2.0, 2.0]  ],  #element 2
] )

z = np.array( [
[ [0.0, 0.5], [0.0, 0.8], [0.0, 1.0]  ],  #element 0
[ [0.3, 1.0], [0.6, 1.2], [0.8, 1.3]  ],  #element 1
[ [1.2, 1.5], [1.3, 1.4], [1.5, 1.7]  ],  #element 2
] )



global_num_pts =  z.size
global_x = np.zeros( global_num_pts )
global_y = np.zeros( global_num_pts )
global_z = np.zeros( global_num_pts )
global_triang_list = list()

offset = 0;
num_triangles = 0;

#process triangulation element-by-element
for k in range(z.shape[0]):
    points_x = x[k,...].flatten()
    points_y = y[k,...].flatten()
    z_element = z[k,...].flatten()
    num_points_this_element = points_x.size

    #auto-generate Delauny triangulation for the element, which should be flawless due to quadrilateral element shape
    triang = tri.Triangulation(points_x, points_y)
    global_triang_list.append( triang.triangles + offset ) #offseting triangle indices by start index of this element

    #store results for this element in global triangulation arrays
    global_x[offset:(offset+num_points_this_element)] = points_x
    global_y[offset:(offset+num_points_this_element)] = points_y
    global_z[offset:(offset+num_points_this_element)] = z_element

    num_triangles += triang.triangles.shape[0]
    offset += num_points_this_element


#go back and turn all of the triangle indices into one global triangle array
offset = 0
global_triang = np.zeros( (num_triangles, 3) )
for t in global_triang_list:
    global_triang[ offset:(offset+t.shape[0] )] = t
    offset += t.shape[0]

plt.figure()
plt.gca().set_aspect('equal')

plt.tripcolor(global_x, global_y, global_triang, global_z, shading='gouraud' )
#plt.tricontour(global_x, global_y, global_triang, global_z )
#plt.triplot(global_x, global_y, global_triang, 'go-') #plot just the triangle mesh

plt.xlim((-0.25, 3.25))
plt.ylim((-0.25, 2.25))
plt.show()
share|improve this answer
1  
remember to accept your own answer if you are happy with it. –  tcaswell Apr 3 '13 at 0:38
    
I have to wait two days before that is allowed, apparently. –  NoahR Apr 3 '13 at 4:41
    
no worries, just pinging as a reminder. In two days it will be far enough down the list I might not see it to remind you ;) –  tcaswell Apr 3 '13 at 5:02
    
I will say that the rendering artifact along internal element triangle faces is displeasing. The linear interpolation between the same two nodes should be identical, so one should not see hint of the internal triangulation. –  NoahR Apr 3 '13 at 18:11

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