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I am trying to do something rather simple but not sure if there's any way around simply creating a dummy instance of my class.

I am trying to simply get the method name of a non-static method using some simple code:

static string GetMethodName(Func<string, int> function  )
        {
            return function.Method.Name;
        }

however I am trying to call this from MyStaticMethod like so and of course it is complaining:

private static void MyStaticMethod()
{
   var a = GetMethodName(MyNonStaticMethod);
}


private int MyNonStaticMethod(string param1)
{
  return 0;
}

Is there any way to accomplish this without creating a dummy instance of the containing class? obviously my case is more complex and I cannot simply make my non static method static (it requires an instance and has dependency bindings). Just wondering if this is possible as all I need is the name (so really don't need an instance). I am trying to get away from magic strings and want some compile time errors when things change.

edit: I've created a static helper class

i have a generic method:

    public static string GetMemberName<T>(
                Expression<Func<T, object>> expression)
            {
                if (expression == null)
                {
                    throw new ArgumentNullException("expression");
                }

                return _GetMemberName(expression.Body);
            }

private static string _GetMemberName(
            Expression expression)
        {   
            if (expression is MemberExpression)
            {
                var memberExpression =
                    (MemberExpression)expression;
                return memberExpression.Member.Name;
            }

            if (expression is MethodCallExpression)
            {
                var methodCallExpression = (MethodCallExpression)expression;
                return methodCallExpression.Method.Name;
            }

            if (expression is UnaryExpression)
            {
                var unaryExpression = (UnaryExpression)expression;
                return GetMemberName(unaryExpression);
            }

            throw new ArgumentException("Unrecognized expression");
        }
share|improve this question
    
Please tag with the relevant language –  Jeff Paquette Apr 2 '13 at 21:23
2  
Essentially you are asking: how can I create a Func<string, int> delegate that points to an instance method, but without any specific instance? –  Virtlink Apr 2 '13 at 21:27
    
well.. sort of, of course I don't need the delegate if I can just get the method name through some other methodology, just posting what I'm trying to do for clarity's sake. I see where you're going, so obviously if there's a solution it can't use the actual instance method. I really just want to do MyNonStaticMethod.ToString()!!! –  Zom Apr 2 '13 at 21:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Of course you can do this. Use Expression<Func<YourInstanceClass, TReturn>> like this:

static string GetMethodName<TReturn>(Expression<Func<YourInstanceClass, TReturn>> function)
{
    var call = function.Body as MethodCallExpression;
    return call != null ? call.Method.Name : "not a single call expression";
}

now you can

var name = GetMethodName(a => a.MyNonStaticMethod("1"));

Console.WriteLine (name); //prints MyNonStaticMethod

where

public class YourInstanceClass
{
    public int MyNonStaticMethod(string param1)
    {
        return 0;
    }
}

I've made MyNonStaticMethod public, so that I can call it outside, but you can left it private and call it in static method inside a class

share|improve this answer
    
ha! Thanks for not calling me a dumba** (as other replies seem to have implied). Yes this is exactly what I am trying to do. I need to brush up on my expression tree khowledge, thanks for getting my head on right! –  Zom Apr 2 '13 at 21:55
    
Note that this requires creating dummy parameters (as opposed to a dummy instance of your class.) If you did still want to use a dummy instance of your class with your original approach, you can use FormatterServices.GetUnitializedObject to create an instance without running the constructor or initializing any fields. –  Dan Bryant Apr 2 '13 at 22:15
    
@DanBryant thanks for note. Choosing between two evils - dummy parameters and uninitialized object, I would chose first. But anyway, thanks for note –  Ilya Ivanov Apr 2 '13 at 22:24

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