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I have a dictionary, i want to change all the keys in that dictionary to the values in another dictionary.

For example:

X = {"apple" : 42}

Y = {"apple" : "Apples"}

After converting:

Dict X = {"Apples" : 42}

def convert(items, ID):
    for key, value in items.items():
        for keys, values in ID.items():
            if keys == key:
                key = values
    return items

So I've written the above code in order to do this, however after executing this function, I print the dictionary and the keys have not changed.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Inside your first loop, you're iterating over the (key, value) pairs. Changing the value of the key variable will not update it on the dictionary.

What you have to do instead is reassign the value to the new key (values) and del the old key. This example creates a new copy so it doesn't modify the dict in place. I've also removed the inner for loop, since in python you can just check if the key is in the dict without iterating over all of them by using if key in dictionary.

def convert(items, id):
    new_dict = items.copy()
    for key, value in items.items():
        if key in id:
            new_key = id[key]
            new_dict[new_key] = items[key] # Copy the value
            del new_dict[key]
    return new_dict

Example ipython session:

In [1]: items = {'apple': 42, 'orange': 17}

In [2]: new_keys = {'apple': 'banana', 'orange': 'tangerine'}

In [3]: def convert(items, ID):
            ...

In [13]: convert(items, new_keys)
Out[13]: {'banana': 42, 'tangerine': 17} # Updated dict returned

In [14]: items
Out[14]: {'apple': 42, 'orange': 17} # Original dict stays untouched
share|improve this answer

This is because you're assigning local variables new values, not assigning dictionary keys new values.

However, to get the desired result, I would suggest doing what others have already suggested and creating a new dictionary, as your keys are not aligned with any existing dictionary:

If you'd like to do that, you have to set the value explicitly by dictionary assignment:

def convert(X, Y):
    new_dict = {}
    for x_key, x_value in X.items():
        for y_key, y_value in Y.items():
            if x_key == y_key:
                new_dict[y_value] = x_value

    return new_dict
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't update the old key with the value of the new dictionary, instead it assigns the values on the new dictionary to the old dict. keys. – Mariano Apr 2 '13 at 22:04
    
I don't think it's 100% clear from the question whether Oliver wanted to update items or ID... I assumed he wanted to update the dict 'items' instead of 'ID'. EDIT: just re-read the question. My answer won't provide the result desired. – DrakeAnderson Apr 2 '13 at 22:08
    
The example shows assigning the values from the ID dict to the keyof the items one, and the problem he's posing is that the keys have not changed. I'm not 100% sure either, but I believe he wanted to update the keys, since he said in his first sentence I want to change the keys in one dictionary to the values in another one – Mariano Apr 2 '13 at 22:12
    
Yes thanks, I see he wanted something completely different than my first answer, so I changed it accordingly. – DrakeAnderson Apr 2 '13 at 22:16
    
Yup Mariano that's what I was trying to get at,sorry if the question wasn't fully clear. Solved it now, thanks for all the responses :) – Oliver Bennett Apr 2 '13 at 22:19

When you call items.items(), you're creating a copy of the dictionary's (key, value) pairs.

Thus, when you change the value of key, you're changing the value of a copy, not the original.

def convert(items, ID):
    for key, value in items.items():
        for keys, values in ID.items():
            if keys == key:
                items[key] = values
    return items
share|improve this answer

Approach

Calculate the shared keys using set intersection.

Code for pre-2.7

def convert(items, ID):
    # Find the shared keys
    dst, src = set(items.keys()), set(ID.keys())
    same_keys, diff_keys = dst.intersection(src), dst.difference(src)
    # Make a new dictionary using the shared keys
    new_values = [(ID[key], items[key]) for key in same_keys]
    old_values = [(key, items[key]) for key in diff_keys]
    return dict(new_values + old_values)

Code for 2.7+

def convert(items, ID):
    # Find the shared keys
    dst, src = set(items.keys()), set(ID.keys())
    same_keys, diff_keys = dst.intersection(src), dst.difference(src)
    # Make a new dictionary using the shared keys
    new_values = {ID[key]: items[key] for key in same_keys}
    old_values = {key: items[key] for key in diff_keys}
    return reduce(lambda dst, src: dst.update(src) or dst, [new_values, old_values], {})

Test for pre-2.7

>>> def convert(items, ID):
...     # Find the shared keys
...     dst, src = set(items.keys()), set(ID.keys())
...     same_keys, diff_keys = dst.intersection(src), dst.difference(src)
...     # Make a new dictionary using the shared keys
...     new_values = [(ID[key], items[key]) for key in same_keys]
...     old_values = [(key, items[key]) for key in diff_keys]
...     return dict(new_values + old_values)
... 
>>> convert({"apple" : 42, "pear": 38}, {"apple" : "Apples", "peach": 31})
{'pear': 38, 'Apples': 42}

Test for 2.7+

>>> def convert(items, ID):
...     # Find the shared keys
...     dst, src = set(items.keys()), set(ID.keys())
...     same_keys, diff_keys = dst.intersection(src), dst.difference(src)
...     # Make a new dictionary using the shared keys
...     new_values = {ID[key]: items[key] for key in same_keys}
...     old_values = {key: items[key] for key in diff_keys}
...     return reduce(lambda dst, src: dst.update(src) or dst, [new_values, old_values], {})
... 
>>> convert({"apple" : 42, "pear": 38}, {"apple" : "Apples", "peach": 31})
{'pear': 38, 'Apples': 42}
share|improve this answer

Is there a reason why you need to modify the existing dictionary rather than just create a new dictionary?

To do this same task by creating a new dictionary, try this:

def convert(items, ID):
    result = {}
    for key, value in items.items():
        if key in ID.keys():
            result[ID[key]] = value
        else:
            result[key] = value
    return result

If you really do want to modify the original dictionary you'll want to create a temporary new dictionary anyway, then fill the original with the contents of the new dictionary, like this

def convert(items, ID):
    result = {}
    for key, value in items.items():
        if key in ID.keys():
            result[ID[key]] = value
        else:
            result[key] = value
    items.clear()
    for key, value in result.items():
        items[key] = value
    return items 

If you don't do it this way then you have to worry about overwriting values, i.e you try to rename a key to something already there. Here's an example of what I mean:

items = {"apples": 10, "bananas": 15}
ID = {"apples": "bananas", "bananas": "oranges"}
convert(items, ID)
print items

I assume that the behavior you want is to end up with {"bananas": 10, "oranges": 15}. What if it first renames "apples" to "bananas"? Then you have {"bananas": 10}, which will then become {"oranges": 10}.

The worst part about this is that it entirely depends on the order in which python iterates through the keys, which depends on the order in which you added them in the first place. If this ever changes in a future version of python, then the behavior of your program could change, which is something you DEFINITELY want to avoid.

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you problem is that you worked in a new local copy of the dictionary or its key and value

if the problem is to return a new dictionary this will work in a single line

def convert(x,y):
    return dict( (y.get(k,k), x[k]) for k in x )
x={'a':10, 'b':5}
y={'a':'A'}
print convert(x,y)

and in python 2.7+ you can even

def convert(x,y):
     return { y.get(k,k): x[k] for k in x }

but if you want to work in the same input dictionary inplace then

def convert(x,y):
     r={ y.get(k,k): x[k] for k in x }
     for k in x.keys(): del x[k]
     x.update(r)

x={'a':10, 'b':5}
y={'a':'A'}
convert(x,y)
print x
share|improve this answer

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