Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

The Problem

How can I truncate a string at a given length without annihilating a unicode character that might be smack in the middle of my length? How can one determine the index of the beginning of a unicode character in a string so that I can avoid creating ugly strings. The square with half of an A visible is the location of another emoji character which has been truncated.

-(NSMutableAttributedString*)constructStatusAttributedStringWithRange:(CFRange)range

NSString *original = [_postDictionay objectForKey:@"message"];

NSMutableString *truncated = [NSMutableString string];

NSArray *components = [original componentsSeparatedByCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet whitespaceCharacterSet]];

for(int x=0; x<[components count]; x++)
{
    //If the truncated string is still shorter then the range desired. (leave space for ...)
    if([truncated length]+[[components objectAtIndex:x] length]<range.length-3)
    {
        //Just checking if its the first word
        if([truncated length]==0 && x==0)
        {
            //start off the string
            [truncated appendString:[components objectAtIndex:0]];
        }
        else
        {
            //append a new word to the string
            [truncated appendFormat:@" %@",[components objectAtIndex:x]];
        }

    }
    else
    {
        x=[components count];
    }
}

if([truncated length]==0 || [truncated length]< range.length-20)
{
    truncated = [NSMutableString stringWithString:[original substringWithRange:NSMakeRange(range.location, range.length-3)]];
}

[truncated appendString:@"..."];

NSMutableAttributedString *statusString = [[NSMutableAttributedString alloc]initWithString:truncated];
[statusString addAttribute:(id)kCTFontAttributeName value:[StyleSingleton streamStatusFont] range:NSMakeRange(0, [statusString length])];
[statusString addAttribute:(id)kCTForegroundColorAttributeName value:(id)[StyleSingleton streamStatusColor].CGColor range:NSMakeRange(0, [statusString length])];

return statusString;

}

UPDATE Thanks to the answer, was able to use one simple function for my needs!

-(NSMutableAttributedString*)constructStatusAttributedStringWithRange:(CFRange)range
{
NSString *original = [_postDictionay objectForKey:@"message"];

NSMutableString *truncated = [NSMutableString stringWithString:[original substringWithRange:[original rangeOfComposedCharacterSequencesForRange:NSMakeRange(range.location, range.length-3)]]];
[truncated appendString:@"..."];

NSMutableAttributedString *statusString = [[NSMutableAttributedString alloc]initWithString:truncated];
[statusString addAttribute:(id)kCTFontAttributeName value:[StyleSingleton streamStatusFont] range:NSMakeRange(0, [statusString length])];
[statusString addAttribute:(id)kCTForegroundColorAttributeName value:(id)[StyleSingleton streamStatusColor].CGColor range:NSMakeRange(0, [statusString length])];

return statusString;

}
share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

NSString has a method rangeOfComposedCharacterSequencesForRange that you can use to find the enclosing range in the string that contains only complete composed characters. For example

NSString *s =  @"😄";
NSRange r = [s rangeOfComposedCharacterSequencesForRange:NSMakeRange(0, 1)];

gives the range { 0, 2 } because the Emoji character is stored as two UTF-16 characters (surrogate pair) in the string.

Remark: You could also check if you can simplify your first loop by using

enumerateSubstringsInRange:options:usingBlock

with the NSStringEnumerationByWords option.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Martin! – Piotr Tomasik Apr 3 '13 at 6:22

"truncate a string at a given length" <-- Do you mean length as in byte length or length as in number of characters? If the latter, then a simple substringToIndex: will suffice (check the bounds first though). If the former, then I'm afraid you'll have to do something like:

NSString *TruncateString(NSString *original, NSUInteger maxBytesToRead, NSStringEncoding targetEncoding) {
    NSMutableString *truncatedString = [NSMutableString string];

    NSUInteger bytesRead = 0;
    NSUInteger charIdx = 0;

    while (bytesRead < maxBytesToRead && charIdx < [original length]) {
        NSString *character = [original substringWithRange:NSMakeRange(charIdx++, 1)];

        bytesRead += [character lengthOfBytesUsingEncoding:targetEncoding];

        if (bytesRead <= maxBytesToRead)
            [truncatedString appendString:character];
    }

    return truncatedString;
}

EDIT: Your code can be rewritten as follows:

NSString *original = [_postDictionay objectForKey:@"message"];

NSArray *characters = [[original componentsSeparatedByCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet whitespaceCharacterSet]] filteredArrayUsingPredicate:[NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"SELF != ''"]];

NSArray *truncatedCharacters = [characters subarrayWithRange:range];

NSString *truncated = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@...", [truncatedCharacters componentsJoinedByString:@" "]];
share|improve this answer
    
I was originally using substringWithRange, and it would cut a unicode character literally in half, for lack of a better explanation. I don't know that substringToIndex would preserve the character. Thoughts? – Piotr Tomasik Apr 3 '13 at 2:04
    
Just tried substringToIndex, and had the same unfortunate results as with substringWithRange – Piotr Tomasik Apr 3 '13 at 2:06
    
Hm…how are you creating your NSString? Are you sure that you specified the proper encoding when creating it? – fumoboy007 Apr 3 '13 at 2:09
    
Updated the question with an image showing the adverse behavior. I am creating the said strings via user-input. – Piotr Tomasik Apr 3 '13 at 2:13
    
Umm…what exactly are you doing in the for loop? (It's kinda hard to read.) You're just combining the whitespace into a single space, right? – fumoboy007 Apr 3 '13 at 2:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.