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Here you are: http://developer.android.com/reference/java/io/PrintStream.html#print%28float%29

Just one function could serve all the purposes:

public void print (Object o) {
    if (o == null) {
        // print "null"
    } else {
        // print o.toString();
    }
}

More elaborations. For example, internal_print(String str) is a function that write to the print stream. Then the only one function needed would be:

public void print (Object o) {
    if (o == null) {
        internal_print( "null" );
    } else {
        internal_print( o.toString() );
    }
}

For other float, int, char, long, etc. overloadings, i can imagine they are just like:

public void print (float o) {
    if (o == null) {
        internal_print( "null" );
    } else {
        internal_print( o.toString() );
    }
}

public void print (int o) {
    if (o == null) {
        internal_print( "null" );
    } else {
        internal_print( o.toString() );
    }
}

public void print (char o) {
    if (o == null) {
        internal_print( "null" );
    } else {
        internal_print( o.toString() );
    }
}

public void print (long o) {
    if (o == null) {
        internal_print( "null" );
    } else {
        internal_print( o.toString() );
    }
}

...

Or even just calling the killer function print (Object o).

Could you please explain. Many thanks!!

share|improve this question
1  
primitives cannot be null, and don't have toString()! –  Eng.Fouad Apr 2 '13 at 22:18
    
Ooops good spot (Y) Thats my fault and typo. But after casted into ((Object) an_int) in function parameter, it can check null and toString(). –  midnite Apr 2 '13 at 22:25
    
Primitives are not objects. They cannot be used as objects. –  MathSquared Apr 2 '13 at 23:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Historical reasons: the PrintStream class exists since Java 1.0, long before autoboxing was added (in 1.5).

Autoboxing is what would enable you to pass a primite type to print(Object o). Without it PrintStream had to implement an overload for each primitive type separately.

By the way, the implementations of print(..) for primitive types is more like:

public void print (int o) {
    print(String.valueOf(o));
}

... and the implementation of String.valueOf(..) basically delegates to methods in wrapper classes, such as Integer.toString(int) and Long.toString(long). You can read the source code at docjar.

share|improve this answer
    
does "autoboxing" means casting ((Object) an_int)? –  midnite Apr 2 '13 at 22:23
1  
Autoboxing means that primitive types such as int are automatically "boxed" in wrapper objects when you need to treat them like objects. docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/data/autoboxing.html –  Joni Apr 2 '13 at 22:28

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