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I'm trying to write a fixed point conversion routine. I need to fit two values plus some flags into an 8 byte packet, so I only have 3 bytes for each value.

My code looks like this:

typedef struct
{
    signed short m;
    unsigned char f;
} Q16_8;

Q16_8 toQ(double d)
{
    Q16_8 q;
    q.m = (signed short)d;
    q.f = (unsigned char)(d * 256.0);
    return q;
}

double toDouble(const Q16_8 q)
{
    return q.m + q.f / 256.0;
}

The results of my tests look like this. Where column 1 is the float, 2 is the fixed point and 3 is the difference.

-2.000000 -2.000000 0.000000
-1.750000 -0.750000 -1.000000
-1.500000 -0.500000 -1.000000
-1.250000 -0.250000 -1.000000
-1.000000 -1.000000 0.000000
-0.750000 0.250000 -1.000000
-0.500000 0.500000 -1.000000
-0.250000 0.750000 -1.000000
0.000000 0.000000 0.000000
0.250000 0.250000 0.000000
0.500000 0.500000 0.000000
0.750000 0.750000 0.000000
1.000000 1.000000 0.000000
1.250000 1.250000 0.000000
1.500000 1.500000 0.000000
1.750000 1.750000 0.000000

What am I doing wrong?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this instead:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct
{
    signed short m;
    unsigned char f;
} Q16_8;

Q16_8 toQ(double d)
{
    Q16_8 q;
    long x = d * 256;
    q.m = x >> 8; // this assumes >> to be an arithmetic shift
    q.f = x & 0xFF; // this assumes signed ints to be 2's complement
    return q;
}

double toDouble(Q16_8 q)
{
    long x = ((long)q.m << 8) + q.f;
    return x / 256.0;
}

int main(void)
{
  int i;
  for (i = -2*4; i <= +2*4; i++)
  {
    double d = i / 4.0;
    Q16_8 q = toQ(d);
    double d2 = toDouble(q);
    printf("toDouble(toQ(%f)) = %f\n", d, d2);
  }
  return 0;
}

Output (ideone):

toDouble(toQ(-2.000000)) = -2.000000
toDouble(toQ(-1.750000)) = -1.750000
toDouble(toQ(-1.500000)) = -1.500000
toDouble(toQ(-1.250000)) = -1.250000
toDouble(toQ(-1.000000)) = -1.000000
toDouble(toQ(-0.750000)) = -0.750000
toDouble(toQ(-0.500000)) = -0.500000
toDouble(toQ(-0.250000)) = -0.250000
toDouble(toQ(0.000000)) = 0.000000
toDouble(toQ(0.250000)) = 0.250000
toDouble(toQ(0.500000)) = 0.500000
toDouble(toQ(0.750000)) = 0.750000
toDouble(toQ(1.000000)) = 1.000000
toDouble(toQ(1.250000)) = 1.250000
toDouble(toQ(1.500000)) = 1.500000
toDouble(toQ(1.750000)) = 1.750000
toDouble(toQ(2.000000)) = 2.000000
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Isn't x >> 8 equivalent to x/256? But yes this solution seems correct. –  Kupto Apr 2 '13 at 23:53
    
@Kupto Do a little research on Arithmetic shift. You could try and see the difference. –  Alexey Frunze Apr 3 '13 at 0:01
1  
This code is potentially dangerous due to applying shifts to negative values. You could make this portable by doing masking, etc. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 3 '13 at 0:36
    
@OliCharlesworth That's why I put there a comment about arithmetic shift. –  Alexey Frunze Apr 3 '13 at 0:37

Take d = -1.75 as an example, and consider the consequences of the following two facts:

  • m will be -1,
  • f can only be positive...
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