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I would like to delete a row from a data frame and sum the resulting columns. I know the row I want to delete based on its contents, but not its row number. Below I present three examples, two of which work. Using - to delete the row only works if the first row is to be deleted. Why is that?

My question is similar to this one: How to delete a row in R However, there the row is deleted based on its row number.

# This works.

state = 'OH'

my.data = read.table(text = "
      county  y1990 y2000
        cc       NA    2
        OH       NA   10
        bb       NA    1
", sep = "", header = TRUE, na.strings = "NA", stringsAsFactors = FALSE)

my.colsums2 <- colSums(my.data[!(my.data$county == state), 2:ncol(my.data)], na.rm=TRUE)
my.colsums2

# y1990 y2000 
#    0     3

# This works.

my.data = read.table(text = "
      county  y1990 y2000
        OH       NA   10
        cc       NA    2
        bb       NA    1
", sep = "", header = TRUE, na.strings = "NA", stringsAsFactors = FALSE)

my.colsums2 <- colSums(my.data[-(my.data$county == state), 2:ncol(my.data)], na.rm=TRUE)
my.colsums2

# y1990 y2000 
#    0     3

# This does not work.

my.data = read.table(text = "
      county  y1990 y2000
        cc       NA    2
        OH       NA   10
        bb       NA    1
", sep = "", header = TRUE, na.strings = "NA", stringsAsFactors = FALSE)

my.colsums2 <- colSums(my.data[-(my.data$county == state), 2:ncol(my.data)], na.rm=TRUE)
my.colsums2

# y1990 y2000 
#    0    11

I guess I am still confused over the difference between ! and -. Thank you for any advice.

share|improve this question
    
I think this is what you're looking for: colSums(my.data[my.data$county != "OH", -1], na.rm = TRUE) –  Arun Apr 2 '13 at 22:38
1  
Actually, the two last examples are wrong, the middle one is working by luck. The negation of a boolean variable is obtained with !, not with -. –  Ferdinand.kraft Apr 2 '13 at 22:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This should clear up the difference between - and !, and I suspect you can take it from there ;)

my.data$county == state
# [1]  TRUE FALSE FALSE

!(my.data$county == state)
# [1] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE

-(my.data$county == state)
# [1] -1  0  0

!, which negates Boolean values, is the operator that you should be using here.

share|improve this answer
1  
Namely, - applied to booleans first converts them to integers (0's and 1's) and then changed their sign. –  joran Apr 2 '13 at 22:40
    
With the third data set, your third line is: [1] 0 -1 0 I am still not clear why -1 0 0 allows the desired result, but 0 -1 0 does not. I will think about it more. Thank you for the answer. –  Mark Miller Apr 2 '13 at 22:44
    
Yes, thanks @joran. -X is literally treated as -1 * X, and during its evaluation, logical values are converted to numeric (just as when doing X + 0, etc.). As an interesting side note, compare the results of +c(TRUE, FALSE) and -c(TRUE, FALSE). –  Josh O'Brien Apr 2 '13 at 22:46
1  
@MarkMiller -- It's just a coincidence that it works. Perhaps trying this will make that clearer: -(c("cc", "bb", "OH", "OH", "bb") == "OH") . –  Josh O'Brien Apr 2 '13 at 22:48
2  
I'm having a giggle here because I'm about to say "not !". I think it's bad practice to negate "-" (negative) a logical value. -TRUE == -1, not FALSE. !LOGICAL = GOOD, -LOGICAL = BAD, or at least not intuitive. How many more times can I use not! –  Brandon Bertelsen Apr 2 '13 at 23:26

I think it's important to remember what you're doing. When you pass a conditional argument to subset a row or column, it needs to be a full length TRUE or FALSE test or, it needs to be numbers that represent the row (or column).

Here's a simple example with a vector. Try entering the conditions into the console to see what they provide

Try these:

x <- rnorm(20)

## These use integer values for indexing
x[which(x > 1)]  # Numbers > Only those numbers which match

## These use logical values for indexing
x[x > 1]    # Logical > Only those that are true
x[!(x < 1)] # Logical > Only those that are false

Bad Behaviour:

x[-which(x > 1)] # Positive numbers to negative numbers = BAD
x[!which(x > 1)] # Converts numbers to logical = BAD
x[-(x > 1)] # Converts logical to numeric = BAD

Specific to your example:

!(my.data$county == state) # Converts TRUE/FALSE to FALSE/TRUE
which(my.data$county != state) # Rows where my.data$count not equal state

Personally, I recommend using which() in all cases to avoid potential negation of a logical or conversion of numeric. It also tends to be easier to "translate"

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer. Please consider adding the recommended which statement to obtain the desired result with the original example. I can probably post one soon, but it might not be optimal. –  Mark Miller Apr 2 '13 at 23:07
    
That's what we're trying to get across with these answers. One creates a vector of numbers (rows) the other produces a logical vector. The right one depends on the situation. You wouldn't be able to say !which(cond) because you're mixing two different types of variables. Just like you shouldn't be saying -(x > 1) –  Brandon Bertelsen Apr 2 '13 at 23:13
    
+1 I really like this answer. (Also, please feel free to roll back the edits I just made if you don't want 'em.) –  Josh O'Brien Apr 2 '13 at 23:19
    
Appreciate the edits, they clarify what I was trying to say. –  Brandon Bertelsen Apr 2 '13 at 23:27
2  
Let's warn against using x[-which(x > 1)] (i.e. -which) as it is a recipe for disaster. See what happens if x <- c(0, 0) for example. So I would recommend quite the opposite: never use which. –  flodel Apr 2 '13 at 23:52

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