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On a rMBP here. I'm not sure what the script is that is responsible for doing this. Basically I want to add the path to python utils to the $PATH...

For example, I brewed python brew python in order to get pip, then ran pip install flake8. Now

$ which flake8
flake8 not found

$ find / | grep flake8
...
......
/usr/local/share/python/flake8

$ ls -la /usr/local/share/python/
total 32
drwxr-xr-x   6 lust  admin  204 Apr  2 18:15 .
drwxr-xr-x  15 lust  admin  510 Apr  2 18:12 ..
lrwxr-xr-x   1 lust  admin   45 Apr  2 18:13 Extras -> ../../Cellar/python/2.7.3/share/python/Extras
-rwxr-xr-x   1 lust  admin  389 Apr  2 18:15 flake8
-rwxr-xr-x   1 lust  admin  385 Apr  2 18:15 pep8
-rwxr-xr-x   1 lust  admin  405 Apr  2 18:15 pyflakes

Alright!

$ cat /private/etc/paths
/usr/bin
/bin
/usr/sbin
/sbin
/usr/local/bin

$ sudo vim /private/etc/paths
$ cat /private/etc/paths
/usr/bin
/bin
/usr/sbin
/sbin
/usr/local/bin
/usr/local/share/python

Make a new shell, check $PATH, python not there. Okay.

Reboot, start a new shell, check $PATH, python still not there.

Oh, by the way, the solution is not to append, with anything like export PATH=$PATH:newpath, because I don't actually care to run flake8 from the command-line, I want Sublime Text 3' SublimeLinter plugin to actually know where it is without putting some hacky config in the settings for the editor.

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I'm not sure what /private is for in OSX, but have you tried just editing /etc/paths? If you only care about your own user, just put export PATH=/usr/local/bin:$PATH into your ~/.profile or ~/.bashrc or whatever is appropriate for your shell. –  Jim Stewart Apr 2 '13 at 23:45
    
/etc/paths appears to mirror /private/etc/paths, i.e. after the reboot it contains the same content. –  Steven Lu Apr 2 '13 at 23:50

1 Answer 1

I found the problem. As part of oh-my-zsh, zsh is set up to set PATH in the ~/.zshrc. I failed to consider this. When starting ST3 without using the command line invocation, it gains its own (incorrect) path environment variable, so that part still doesn't work. The ultimate resolution to the problem, however, is here.

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