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Just learned about JavaScript module pattern. Love it!

So, I created my generic custom library which is located in one file which I include on all my projects. I then want to add a couple project specific methods for each individual project, and would like to put them in a separate file. Instead of creating a whole new object for these methods, I would like to add them to my existing MODULE object.

How do I do this? Thanks

var MODULE = (function () {
    var my = {},
        privateVariable = 1;

    function privateMethod() {
        // ...
    }

    my.moduleProperty = 1;
    my.moduleMethod = function () {
        // ...
    };

    return my;
}());
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Without explaining what all the properties/methods do in your module, just use MODULE.whateverYouWant = whatever; in your specific places –  Ian Apr 2 '13 at 23:36
    
MODULE.foo = "foo" ?? –  elclanrs Apr 2 '13 at 23:37
    
Thanks Ian and Elclanrs. So, I do not need the closure parenthesis? –  user1032531 Apr 2 '13 at 23:43
    
@user1032531 No, you can keep those, to keep a specific scope when declaring MODULE. But if you want to add properties/methods to it later (outside of that file), you can just say MODULE.whatever = whatever; –  Ian Apr 2 '13 at 23:46
    
@Ian. And will the namespace for MODULE.whatever be the same as my original methods? –  user1032531 Apr 2 '13 at 23:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can add a property or function by just saying Module.namedproperty = ...whatever...

But it should be noted that if this is in a different file it won't have access to any private variables in the module state.

If you want to have additional private state for these new methods, or want to not worry about which file is run first you can set up your modules like this

var MODULE = (function (my) {
    var privateVariable = 1;

    function privateMethod() {
        // ...
    }

    my.moduleProperty = 1;
    my.moduleMethod = function () {
        // ...
    };

    return my;
}(MODULE||{}));

Which will create a new module if the module hasn't been created yet, or add to the existing one if it has.

The private variables will still be private to their own particular closure though, and not to the namespace/module as a whole.

Update to explain

This module format takes in an input into its closure function. If MODULE is already defined, it takes in the MODULE object, otherwise it creates a new empty object. || is logical OR, so MODULE||{} is the same as "if MODULE is defined and is truthy (which an object like MODULE will be), then pass it, if it is undefined or otherwise falsy, pass an empty object.

The extra parentheses are not strictly necessary, but they're a convention to make it clear that the result of the function is being passed, not the function itself.

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I think you are on the right path, but don't know if this is exactly correct. Why have the open parenthesis in the very beginning and the closing parenthesis at the very end? Can you explain what is happening? For instance, if object MODULE doesn't exist, then create a new one, else pass something to the existing one... –  user1032531 Apr 3 '13 at 0:03
    
I actually think you are now correct since it works! Please still explain what is happening. –  user1032531 Apr 3 '13 at 0:05
    
The extra parenthesis are for readability. If you see ...=(function(){... then you can be fairly certain you are reading an immediately invoked function expression (IIFE). If you see =function(){... then it's not until you see the closing }(); that you realise it's an IIFE rather than a plain function expression. Of course you can enclose a function expression in parenthesis and not call the function, but that's just making life difficult. –  RobG Apr 3 '13 at 0:15
    
@user1032531 updated to explain. You can also check out more here: adequatelygood.com/JavaScript-Module-Pattern-In-Depth.html –  Ben McCormick Apr 3 '13 at 0:15

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