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Im new to classes in Javascript, but I trying to create a simple drawing app, with Raphael. The problem I have currently is with some code that works when it is in the same file, but then when I try to take it out and include it, it gives me:

 Uncaught TypeError: undefined is not a function. 

My first thought was that the file isn't getting included correctly, so I checked, and chrome's dev helper tools show the resource just fine.

The code is in a file called line.js:

 function line(paper) {
        this.x1 = null;
        this.x2 = null;
        this.y1 = null;
        this.y2 = null;

        this.paper = paper;
    };
    line.prototype.draw = function(){
            this.paper.path(
                            "M " + this.x1 + " " + this.y1 +
                            " l " + (this.x2 - this.x1) + " " + (this.y2 - this.y1) + " z"
                            );
    };

and the code in question that is using it is:

    <script type="text/javascript" src="../js/raphael-min2.1.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="../js/line.js"></script>

    <script>
    window.onload = function() {  
        var paper = new Raphael($('#canvas')[0], 500, 500);
        var canvas =$('#canvas');

        var line = new line(paper);

        canvas.mousedown(function(e){
            line.x1 = e.offsetX;
            line.y1 = e.offsetY;
        });

        canvas.mouseup(function(e){
            line.x2 = e.offsetX;
            line.y2 = e.offsetY;
            line.draw();
        });
    };
</script>

I've never used classes in javascript before, nor included js files that i've made myself, so any light on the matter, not just a fix would be nice. Also if you think there is a better approach to how Im doing this in general, please let me know! Thanks a lot!

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This problem occurs because your object's name and class' name is identical. Try to give a different name to your object like this:

var newLine=new line(paper);

Moreover, when I try to give identical name to both the object and class, I get TypeError: line is not a constructor in Firebug and this error occurs when I put code into line.js or the place before window.onload.

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that fixed it, but why did it stop working when I moved it to it's own file? –  Samuraisoulification Apr 3 '13 at 0:49
    
There is a difference between Chrome's debugging tool and Firebug. I think when you put all your code in one place, Chrome treats line as a class at var line=new line(); and then treats it like an object at the rest of code. –  haitaka Apr 3 '13 at 0:54
    
I see, okay, thanks a lot! –  Samuraisoulification Apr 3 '13 at 1:41
    
I believe, by convention, that your function should be called Line if you're using it as a constructor (i.e. putting the "new" keyword in front of it). That would probably also solve your issue. –  Craig Shearer Apr 3 '13 at 1:46
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