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To summarize, I have been receiving some interesting errors in a chessboard program. I ran Valgrind with ~$ valgrind --track-origins=yes ./a.out and got some error reports that I am having difficulty interpreting.

==10171== Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s)
==10171==    at 0x80488C2: diagnols.2353 (eq1.c:95)
==10171==    by 0x8048942: check.2372 (eq1.c:109)
==10171==    by 0x80485E6: recur (eq1.c:118)
==10171==    by 0x804872B: recur (eq1.c:151)
==10171==    by 0x804868C: recur (eq1.c:141)
==10171==    by 0x804868C: recur (eq1.c:141)
==10171==    by 0x804868C: recur (eq1.c:141)
==10171==    by 0x804868C: recur (eq1.c:141)
==10171==    by 0x804868C: recur (eq1.c:141)
==10171==    by 0x804868C: recur (eq1.c:141)
==10171==    by 0x804868C: recur (eq1.c:141)
==10171==    by 0x8048618: recur (eq1.c:123)
==10171==  Uninitialised value was created by a heap allocation
==10171==    at 0x402BB7A: malloc (in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-x86-linux.so)
==10171==    by 0x804897A: main (eq1.c:159)

Here are some of the instances in the code:

  • recur, line 123:

    if ( (result == 2)/*&&(width!=7)*/  ) {
      // go to next row, try first column
      puts("Option 1\n");
      recur(key, (depth + 1), 0);  // line 123
    } 
    
  • recur, line 141:

    else if (  (result != 2)&&(width<7)  ) { // didn't work, try next column
      // go to next column, same row
      puts("Option 3\n");
      key->board[depth][width] = 0;
      recur(key, depth, (width+1));  // line 141
    
  • diagnols, line 95:

    while (  ((abc>=0)&&(bcd>=0) && (abc<=7)&&(bcd<=7))  ) {
      if (key->board[abc][bcd] == 1) {
    counter++;
      }
    

Entire diagnols function:

  int diagnols(int PARAMETER_ONE, int PARAMETER_TWO) { // returns 0 if good
    int abc = 0;
    int bcd = 0;
    int counter = 0;

    // first check diagnol up and to the left
    abc = PARAMETER_ONE-1;
    bcd = PARAMETER_TWO-1;
    while ( bcd>=0 && abc>=0 && abc<=7 && bcd<=7  ) {
      if (key->board[abc][bcd] == 1) {
        counter++;
      } abc--;
      bcd--;
    }

    // checking diagnol up and to the right
    abc = PARAMETER_ONE-1;
    bcd = PARAMETER_TWO+1;
    while ( abc>=0 && bcd>=0  && abc<=7 && bcd<=7  ) {
      if (key->board[abc][bcd] == 1) {
        counter++;
      } abc--;
      bcd++;
    }

    // checkign diagnol down and to the left
    abc = PARAMETER_ONE+1;
    bcd = PARAMETER_TWO-1;
    while ( abc>=0 && bcd>=0 && abc<=7 && bcd<=7  ) {
      if (key->board[abc][bcd] == 1) {
        counter++;
      } abc++;
      bcd--;
    }

    // checking diagnol down and to the right
    abc = PARAMETER_ONE+1;
    bcd = PARAMETER_TWO+1;
    while ( abc>=0 && bcd>=0 && abc<=7 && bcd<=7  ) {
      if (key->board[abc][bcd] == 1) {
        counter++;
      } abc++;
      bcd++;
    }

    return counter;
  }

Origin trace:

int main() {
  struct chessboard* master = malloc(sizeof(struct chessboard));

 /* zero out board */
 int one = 0;
 int two = 0;
 for (one; one <= 7; one++) {
   for (two; two <= 7; two++) {
     master->board[one][two] = 0;
   }
 }

Struct is:

struct chessboard {
  int board[8][8];  // corrected
};

SECOND GROUP OF ERRORS

==10171== Invalid read of size 4
==10171==    at 0x8048767: vertical.2344 (eq1.c:51)
==10171==    by 0x804892B: check.2372 (eq1.c:108)
==10171==    by 0x80485E6: recur (eq1.c:118)
==10171==    by 0x804872B: recur (eq1.c:151)
==10171==    by 0x804868C: recur (eq1.c:141)
==10171==    by 0x804868C: recur (eq1.c:141)
==10171==    by 0x804868C: recur (eq1.c:141)
==10171==    by 0x804868C: recur (eq1.c:141)
==10171==    by 0x804868C: recur (eq1.c:141)
==10171==    by 0x804868C: recur (eq1.c:141)
==10171==    by 0x804868C: recur (eq1.c:141)
==10171==    by 0x8048618: recur (eq1.c:123)
==10171==  Address 0x41f8128 is 0 bytes after a block of size 256 alloc'd
==10171==    at 0x402BB7A: malloc (in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-x86-linux.so)
==10171==    by 0x804897A: main (eq1.c:159)

Obviously a lot of the same lines come up.

  • Vertical function:

    int vertical(int PARAMETER) { // param = 2nd val in 2D || returns 1 if good
      int ab = 0;
      int counter = 0;
      for (ab; ab <= 7; ab++) {
        if (  (key->board[ab][PARAMETER] == 1)  ) {
        counter++;
        }
      } return counter; // if one, it is okay; if > 1, not okay
    }
    

I'm not really sure what the problem is. It seems like it doesn't like my malloc but I initialize it immediately. I have tried changing array size, changing loop bounds, calloc() instead of malloc() and more. Any help is appreciated!


entire program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct chessboard {
  int board[8][8];
};

void print_board(struct chessboard* key) {
  for(int a = 0; a <= 7; a++) {
    for(int b = 0; b <= 7; b++) {
      if (key->board[a][b]==0) {
    printf("[x]");
      } else {
    printf(" q ");
      }
    } 
    printf("\n");
  } 
  puts("\n");
}

int recur(struct chessboard* key, int DEPTH, int WIDTH) {

  int depth = DEPTH;
  int width = WIDTH;

  /* set a piece as a queen */
  key->board[depth][width] = 1;

  /* check for conflicts */
  int horizontal(int column) { // param = first val in 2D || returns 1 if good
    int a = 0;
    int counter = 0;
    for(;a <= 7; a++) {
      if (  key->board[column][a] == 1  ) {
    counter++;
      }
    }
    return counter; // if one, it it is okay; if > 1, not okay
  }

  int vertical(int row) { // param = 2nd val in 2D || returns 1 if good
    int ab = 0;
    int counter = 0;
    for(;ab <= 7; ab++) {
      if (  (key->board[ab][row] == 1)  ) {
    counter++;
      }
    } 
    return counter; // if one, it is okay; if > 1, not okay
  }

  int diagnols(int column, int row) { // returns 0 if good

    int counter = 0;

    // first check diagnol up and to the left
    int abc = column-1;
    int bcd = row-1;
    while (  bcd>=0 && abc>=0 && abc<=7 && bcd<=7  ) {
      if (key->board[abc][bcd] == 1) {
    counter++;
      } abc--;
      bcd--;
    }

    // checking diagnol up and to the right
    abc = column-1;
    bcd = row+1;
    while (  abc>=0 && bcd>=0 && abc<=7 && bcd<=7  ) {
      if (key->board[abc][bcd] == 1) {
    counter++;
      } 
      abc--;
      bcd++;
    }

    // checkign diagnol down and to the left
    abc = column+1;
    bcd = row-1;
    while (  (abc>=0)&&(bcd>=0) && (abc<=7)&&(bcd<=7)  ) {
      if (key->board[abc][bcd] == 1) {
    counter++;
      } 
      abc++;
      bcd--;
    }

    // checking diagnol down and to the right
    abc = column+1;
    bcd = row+1;
    while (  abc>=0 && bcd>=0 && abc<=7 && bcd<=7  ) {
      if (key->board[abc][bcd] == 1) {
    counter++;
      } 
      abc++;
      bcd++;
    }

    return counter;
  }
  int check(int param1, int param2) { // if okay returns 2 
    int h = horizontal(param1);
    int v = vertical(param2);
    int d = diagnols(param1, param2);
    int total = 0;
    total = (h + v + d); // if okay, equals 2
    return total;
  }
  print_board(key); // shows process, can be annoying


  /* choose what to do next 
  * option puts() statements are there for debugging
  */
  int result = check(depth,width);

  if ( result == 2 && depth != 7 ) { // worked, go deeper
    // go to next row, try first column
    puts("Option 1\n");
    recur(key, (depth + 1), 0);
  } 

  else if (  result == 2 && depth==7  ) { // done
    puts("Option 2\n");
    return 1;
  } 

  else if (  result != 2 && width<7  ) { // didn't work, try next column
    // go to next column, same row
    puts("Option 3\n");
    key->board[depth][width] = 0;
    recur(key, depth, (width+1));
  } 

  else if (  result !=2 && width == 7  ) { // didn't work AND no more column space
    puts("Option 1\n");
    key->board[depth][width] = 0;  // set this queen to zero
    for (int e = 0;e<=7;e++){ // find queen in previous row, set it to zero and recur
    if (key->board[(depth-1)][e] == 1) {
        key->board[(depth-1)][e] = 0;
        recur(key, (depth-1), (e+1)); // could go out of bounds
    }
    }
  }
  return 0;
}

int main() {
  struct chessboard* master = malloc(sizeof(struct chessboard));

  /* zero out board */
  for(int one = 0; one <= 7; one++) {
    for(int two = 0; two <= 7; two++) {
      master->board[one][two] = 0;
    }
  }

  /* run */
  int result = 0;
  result = recur(master, 0, 0);

  /* finish */
  printf("Result was: %i\n", result);
  free(master);
  return 0;

}
share|improve this question
    
That's an odd size of chess board; most of them are 8x8 squares. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 3 '13 at 2:29
    
@JonathanLeffler Chessboard spaces are based at one, not zero. –  d0rmLife Apr 3 '13 at 2:34
    
But your array is int board[7][7];, so the valid array indices are 0..6! –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 3 '13 at 2:36
    
@d0rmLife You are misunderstanding how you declare an array. int a[7] declares an array with indices 0 through 6, meaning you've created a 7x7 board. –  Chris Hayes Apr 3 '13 at 2:36
1  
On an unrelated note, lines like int one = 0; where you're declaring a variable just to use it as a non-meaningful loop counter constant are very, very poor practice and just make your code difficult to read. Use the constants 0 and 7 in your for loop. –  Chris Hayes Apr 3 '13 at 2:38
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Original version of the question

For some reason, you are using a 7x7 chessboard instead of a normal 8x8 one:

struct chessboard {
  int board[7][7];
};

This structure can be indexed correctly with index values 0..6 in each dimension. You can get away with (but it is only 'get away with') some (and only 'some') accesses where the index is 7, but they're strictly invoking undefined behaviour, which means 'anything could happen', including 'it works almost as expected'.

In the code at line 95 of diagnols(), you have:

while (((abc >= 0) && (bcd >= 0) && (abc <= 7) && (bcd <= 7)))
{
    if (key->board[abc][bcd] == 1)
        counter++;
    ...
}

Now, if either index is equal to 7, you're likely to be accessing out of bounds memory.


Amended version of the question

Well, since your board is 8x8, not 7x7, that makes more sense. The memory allocation of 256 bytes (8 * 8 * sizeof(int)) for the chess board also makes sense.

When you have arrays, the standard, idiomatic array of writing the array bounds is not:

/* zero out board */
int one = 0;
int two = 0;
for (one; one <= 7; one++) {
  for (two; two <= 7; two++) {
    master->board[one][two] = 0;
  }
}

but

for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < 8; j++)
        master->board[i][j] = 0;
}

The idiomatic bit is the use of for (int index = 0; index < bound; index++), rather than the choice of variable names (though i and j is more conventional than one and two), or the placement or number of braces (both entirely subjective). And there's no problem with pre-declaring the indexes and then using for (index = 0; index < bound; index++), especially if your compiler doesn't support C99.

The Group 1 problems are occurring in:

while (  ((abc>=0)&&(bcd>=0) && (abc<=7)&&(bcd<=7))  ) {
  if (key->board[abc][bcd] == 1) {
    counter++;
  }

This probably means that one of abc or bcd is not properly initialized, so you are making conditional computations on the basis of an uninitialized variable. The alternative is that key->board[abc][bcd] is not properly initialized, which means that the initialization loop is wrong.

Also, the conditions in the while loop should be like those in the for loop:

while (abc >= 0 && bcd >= 0 && abc < 8 and bcd < 8)

These asymmetric bounds (greater than or equal to lower bound — usually zero — and less than upper bound) are generally regarded as better style. All else apart, you can use enum { SIDE = 8 }; and then reference SIZE instead of 7 (or 8) everywhere.

For the Group 2 errors, you've not shown us the code in function vertical so we can't tell what you're doing wrong except that it looks like your array index is too large.


Critique continued

Now there's some extra code to review...

int vertical(int PARAMETER) { // param = 2nd val in 2D || returns 1 if good
  int ab = 0;
  int counter = 0;
  for (ab; ab <= 7; ab++) {
    if (  (key->board[ab][PARAMETER] == 1)  ) {
    counter++;
    }
  } return counter; // if one, it is okay; if > 1, not okay
}

Generally, C coders use ALL_CAPS_NAMES to indicate macro values #define SIZE 8 or enum constants enum { SIZE = 8 };. If other people are to read your code, they'll expect that, so I recommend following that style guideline. Also, choose more meaningful names; int vertical(int column) would be more sensible, would it not? Or int vertical(int col) since the other dimension is row and then you have two 3-letter names. Have you considered the use of assert from <assert.h>?

int vertical(int column)
{
    int counter = 0;
    assert(column >= 0 && column < 8);
    for (int row = 0; row < 8; row++)
    {
        if (key->board[row][column] == 1)
           counter++;
    }
    return counter;
}

If the only values in the board are 0 and 1, you don't even need the condition; you can simply write:

int vertical(int column)
{
    int counter = 0;
    assert(column >= 0 && column < 8);
    for (int row = 0; row < 8; row++)
        counter += key->board[row][column];
    return counter;
}

At the moment, the only way I can think of for the out-of-bounds memory access to occur in vertical() — any version of it — is because the column parameter is 8. The assertion will diagnose if that is the problem.

I guess the function diagnols() is determining whether there are two queens on the same diagonal? Have you seen any of the Harry Potter movies? Remember Diagon Alley — diagonally.

The code you show is:

  int diagnols(int PARAMETER_ONE, int PARAMETER_TWO) { // returns 0 if good
    int abc = 0;
    int bcd = 0;
    int counter = 0;

I think the parameter names should be row and col; you're searching from the given position [row][col] up and down the diagonals.

    // first check diagnol up and to the left
    abc = PARAMETER_ONE-1;
    bcd = PARAMETER_TWO-1;

The initialization of abc and bcd to 0 above is superfluous given the assignments here. You should probably assert that the parameters are both in the range 0..7.

    while ( bcd>=0 && abc>=0 && abc<=7 && bcd<=7  ) {
      if (key->board[abc][bcd] == 1) {
        counter++;
      } abc--;
      bcd--;
    }

Please don't put the close brace and another statement on the same line. Other comments about asymmetric ranges etc still apply, of course, but I won't repeat them. Also the observation about 0's, 1's and simple summing.

    // checking diagnol up and to the right
    abc = PARAMETER_ONE-1;
    bcd = PARAMETER_TWO+1;
    while ( abc>=0 && bcd>=0  && abc<=7 && bcd<=7  ) {
      if (key->board[abc][bcd] == 1) {
        counter++;
      } abc--;
      bcd++;
    }

    // checkign diagnol down and to the left
    abc = PARAMETER_ONE+1;
    bcd = PARAMETER_TWO-1;
    while ( abc>=0 && bcd>=0 && abc<=7 && bcd<=7  ) {
      if (key->board[abc][bcd] == 1) {
        counter++;
      } abc++;
      bcd--;
    }

    // checking diagnol down and to the right
    abc = PARAMETER_ONE+1;
    bcd = PARAMETER_TWO+1;
    while ( abc>=0 && bcd>=0 && abc<=7 && bcd<=7  ) {
      if (key->board[abc][bcd] == 1) {
        counter++;
      } abc++;
      bcd++;
    }

    return counter;
  }

The four blocks of code are very similar. In fact, I think you could create a simple function that does a generic search.

int count_collisions(int row, int col, int row_inc, int col_inc)
{
    int count = 0;
    assert(row >= 0 && row < 8);
    assert(col >= 0 && col < 8);
    assert(row_inc >= -1 && row_inc <= +1);  // Not good for jumps in draughts/checkers
    assert(col_inc >= -1 && row_inc <= +1);
    assert(col_inc !=  0 || row_inc !=  0);  // Both zero is gives an infinite loop
    while (row >= 0 && row < 8 && col >= 0 && col < 8)
    {
        count += key->board[row][col];
        col += col_inc;
        row += row_inc;
    }
    return count;
}

int diagonals(int row, int col)
{
    int num = 0;
    num += count_collisions(row, col, +1, +1);
    num += count_collisions(row, col, +1, -1);
    num += count_collisions(row, col, -1, +1);
    num += count_collisions(row, col, -1, -1);
    return num;
}

int vertical(int col)
{
    return count_collisions(0, col, +1, 0);
}

int horizontal(int row)
{
    return count_collisions(row, 0, 0, +1);
}

One of the dicta from the excellent (but slightly dated and out of print) book "[The Elements of Programming Style][1]" by Kernighan and Plauger applies:

  • the subroutine call permits us to summarize the irregularities in the argument list [...]
  • [t]he subroutine itself summarizes the regularities of the code [...]

I think the count_collisions() routine and the functions that use it reasonably epitomize that.

(See also: DRY if statements.)


The only way I can see for there to be an uninitialized variable in the current diagnols() is if one or the other of the parameter values is not initialized. Establishing what's going on there would require scrutiny of the code that calls diagnols().


With full code present

The basic compilation is pretty clean. I didn't mention some options I actually use when compiling, so I got 4 warnings that are not disastrous at all:

$ gcc -O3 -g -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -Wmissing-prototypes -Wstrict-prototypes -Wold-style-definition 8q.c -o 8q  
8q.c:8:6: warning: no previous prototype for ‘print_board’ [-Wmissing-prototypes]
8q.c:22:5: warning: no previous prototype for ‘recur’ [-Wmissing-prototypes]
8q.c:150:5: warning: function declaration isn’t a prototype [-Wstrict-prototypes]
8q.c: In function ‘main’:
8q.c:150:5: warning: old-style function definition [-Wold-style-definition]
$

And I got one complaint from valgrind, the read at the end. I recompiled without the -O3 and got better diagnostics from valgrind:

I then added assertions on the function parameters for rows and columns in the range row >= 0 && row < 8 or equivalent, and one of the assertions fired:

Assertion failed: (WIDTH >= 0 && WIDTH < 8), function recur, file 8q.c, line 30.
==23867== 
==23867== Process terminating with default action of signal 6 (SIGABRT)
==23867==    at 0x2C582A: __kill (in /usr/lib/system/libsystem_kernel.dylib)
==23867==    by 0x1A85DD: __assert_rtn (in /usr/lib/system/libsystem_c.dylib)
==23867==    by 0x100001747: recur (8q.c:30)
==23867==    by 0x1000018D8: recur (8q.c:152)
==23867==    by 0x10000182F: recur (8q.c:143)
==23867==    by 0x10000182F: recur (8q.c:143)
==23867==    by 0x10000182F: recur (8q.c:143)
==23867==    by 0x10000182F: recur (8q.c:143)
==23867==    by 0x10000182F: recur (8q.c:143)
==23867==    by 0x10000182F: recur (8q.c:143)
==23867==    by 0x10000182F: recur (8q.c:143)
==23867==    by 0x1000017BB: recur (8q.c:131)
==23867== 

So, right at the end, you are (probably) calling recur() with a WIDTH of 8 (as opposed to a negative value — you can split the assertion into two separate conditions to be sure). There are comments in your recur() function about going out of bounds:

    recur(key, (depth-1), (e+1)); // could go out of bounds

Don't! It isn't safe. Make sure you head off trouble at the pass. And assert is a simple but sometimes (actually, quite often) effective tool.

I stated confidently, but as I think about it more, the confidence wanes:

The line actually causing the trouble is probably this one, though that should be a write, not a read:

/* set a piece as a queen */
key->board[depth][width] = 1;

You haven't checked depth and (in this case) width for validity.

share|improve this answer
    
Setting the struct to [8][8] does not fix it. In fact, that is how I have it--I wrote the (wrong) struct I was using earlier! My Valgrind reports are from a program with an [8][8] array. –  d0rmLife Apr 3 '13 at 2:38
1  
So, you want us to divine how your actual source code differs from what you're showing us, so that we can guess what you're actually doing wrong, rather than what you're showing us? Please!!! –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 3 '13 at 2:40
    
It was a typo. I corrected it. No sorcery needed. –  d0rmLife Apr 3 '13 at 2:43
    
You make a fine impression, providing such a thorough response after my aggravating typo. +1 for that alone. Onto coding... I understand that something is uninitialized, but I fail to see where/what it is. I assume it is not my int counters, as I have made it annoyingly clear what their values are. However, I also don't see what is wrong my with array declaration/passing of pointer. I added the vertical(..) function, too. EDIT I also added the complete diagnols() function. I don't see any uninitialized values; must be the array? –  d0rmLife Apr 3 '13 at 3:06
    
I've added some more analysis...the array initialization loop looked fine, so I think there must be something else going on with parameters to the diagnols() function — and we'll only spot that with the full code. What compilation options are you using? I'd recommend gcc -O3 -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -Werror; with the -O3, the compiler may be able to warn you about uninitialized variables. Any warnings from that should be scrutinized and the cause fixed. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 3 '13 at 4:40
show 4 more comments

The first error is occurring because you malloced something (presumably a chessboard which appears to be called key) and failed to set some of the struct's internal members before attempting to read from them. That is to say, you try to read key->board[abc][bcd] without assigning to that location first.

You have not posted the appropriate code for the other error. Also note that posting all of your code is helpful, since lines of a program rarely exist in a vacuum.

share|improve this answer
    
The program is rather large so I was trying to be parsimonious. I added more detail. As you can see, I set all the elements to zero. However that does not result in an error. Which error do you find the code lacking for? –  d0rmLife Apr 3 '13 at 2:35
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