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Is there a common way to pass a single item of type T to a method which expects an IEnumerable<T> parameter? Language is C#, framework version 2.0.

Currently I am using a helper method (it's .Net 2.0, so I have a whole bunch of casting/projecting helper methods similar to LINQ), but this just seems silly:

public static class IEnumerableExt
{
    // usage: IEnumerableExt.FromSingleItem(someObject);
    public static IEnumerable<T> FromSingleItem<T>(T item)
    {
        yield return item; 
    }
}

Other way would of course be to create and populate a List<T> or an Array and pass it instead of IEnumerable<T>.

[Edit] As an extension method it might be named:

public static class IEnumerableExt
{
    // usage: someObject.SingleItemAsEnumerable();
    public static IEnumerable<T> SingleItemAsEnumerable<T>(this T item)
    {
        yield return item; 
    }
}

Am I missing something here?

[Edit2] We found someObject.Yield() (as @Peter suggested in the comments below) to be the best name for this extension method, mainly for brevity, so here it is along with the XML comment if anyone wants to grab it:

public static class IEnumerableExt
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Wraps this object instance into an IEnumerable&lt;T&gt;
    /// consisting of a single item.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"> Type of the object. </typeparam>
    /// <param name="item"> The instance that will be wrapped. </param>
    /// <returns> An IEnumerable&lt;T&gt; consisting of a single item. </returns>
    public static IEnumerable<T> Yield<T>(this T item)
    {
        yield return item;
    }
}
share|improve this question
4  
I would make a slight modification in the body of the extension method: if (item == null) yield break; Now you're stopped from passing null as well as taking advantage of the (trivial) null object pattern for IEnumerable. (foreach (var x in xs) handles an empty xs just fine). Incidentally, this function is the monadic unit for the list monad that is IEnumerable<T>, and given the monad love-fest at Microsoft I'm surprised something like this isn't in the framework in the first place. –  Matt Enright Nov 11 '09 at 12:49
2  
For the extension method, you shouldn't name it AsEnumerable because a built-in extension with that name already exists. (When T implements IEnumerable, e.g., string.) –  Jon-Eric Aug 13 '12 at 16:12
1  
@MattEnright the if (item == null) yield break can only be used if T is a class type. You would have to code it in a different and less efficient way. Something like if(T == default(T) && typeof(T).IsClass) yield break; –  Saysmaster Nov 4 '12 at 0:29
2  
@Saysmaster Just because item == null doesn't ever return false for a value type doesn't mean that you can't use it - it's a perfectly legal statement with the intended semantics. –  Matt Enright Nov 5 '12 at 16:33
13  
How about naming the method Yield? Nothing beats brevity. –  Philip Nov 19 '12 at 8:13

12 Answers 12

up vote 45 down vote accepted

Your helper method is the cleanest way to do it, IMO. If you pass in a list or an array, then an unscrupulous piece of code could cast it and change the contents, leading to odd behaviour in some situations. You could use a read-only collection, but that's likely to involve even more wrapping. I think your solution is as neat as it gets.

share|improve this answer
    
well if the list/array is built ad-hoc, its scope ends after the method call, so it shouldn't cause problems –  Mario Fernandez Oct 16 '09 at 12:55
    
If sent in as an array, how can it be changed? I guess it could be cast to an array, and then change the reference to something else, but what good would that do? (I'm probably missing something though...) –  Svish Oct 16 '09 at 12:55
1  
Suppose you decided to create one enumerable to pass to two different methods... then the first one cast it to an array and changed the contents. You then pass it as an argument to another method, unaware of the change. I'm not saying it's likely, just that having something mutable when it doesn't need to be is less neat than naturla immutability. –  Jon Skeet Oct 16 '09 at 12:58
3  
This is an accepted answer, and most likely to be read, so I will add my concern here. I tried this method, but that broke my previously compiling call to myDict.Keys.AsEnumerable() where myDict was of type Dictionary<CheckBox, Tuple<int, int>>. After I renamed the extension method to SingleItemAsEnumerable, everything started to work. Cannot convert IEnumerable<Dictionary<CheckBox,System.Tuple<int,int>>.KeyCollection>' to 'IEnumerable<CheckBox>'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?) I can live with a hack for a while, but can other power hackers find a better way? –  Hamish Grubijan Oct 17 '11 at 17:24
2  
@HamishGrubijan: It sounds like you wanted just dictionary.Values to start with. Basically it's not clear what's going on, but I suggest you start a new question about it. –  Jon Skeet Oct 17 '11 at 17:33

Well, if the method expects an IEnumerable you've got to pass something that is a list, even if it contains one element only.

passing

new T[] { item }

as the argument should be enough I think

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8  
I think you might even drop the T, since it will be inferred (unless I am very wrong here :p) –  Svish Oct 16 '09 at 12:51
    
not sure there, but wouldn't that be C# 3 and not 2? –  StampedeXV Oct 16 '09 at 13:07
2  
I think it's not inferred in C# 2.0. –  Groo Oct 16 '09 at 13:12
4  
"Language is C#, framework version 2" The C# 3 compiler can infer T, and the code will be fully compatible with .NET 2. –  Simon Svensson Oct 16 '09 at 13:25

In C# 3.0 you can utilize the System.Linq.Enumerable class:

// using System.Linq

Enumerable.Repeat(item, 1);

This will create a new IEnumerable that only contains your item.

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6  
I think that this solution will make the code harder to read. :( Repeat on a single element is quite counter-intuitive don't you think? –  Drahakar Apr 10 '11 at 22:14
    
Repeat once reads ok to me. Far simpler solution without having to worry about adding yet another extension method, and ensuring the namespace is included wherever you want to use it. –  Si. Apr 9 '13 at 2:20
    
Yeah I actually just use new[]{ item } myself, I just thought that was an interesting solution. –  luksan Apr 9 '13 at 3:01
2  
This solution is money. –  ProVega Oct 11 '13 at 4:28

In C# 3 (I know you said 2), you can write a generic extension method which might make the syntax a little more acceptable:

static class IEnumerableExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> ToEnumerable<T>(this T item)
    {
        yield return item;
    }
}

client code is then item.ToEnumerable().

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I am aware of that (works in .Net 2.0 if I use C# 3.0), I was just wondering if there was a built in mechanism for this. –  Groo Oct 16 '09 at 13:04
8  
This is a really nice alternative. I only want to suggest renaming to ToEnumerable to avoid messing up with System.Linq.Enumerable.AsEnumerable –  Fede Aug 12 '11 at 17:49
1  
As a side note, there already exists a ToEnumerable extension method for IObservable<T>, so this method name also interferes with existing conventions. Honestly, I'd suggest not using an extension method at all, simply because it's too generic. –  Christopher Harris Nov 25 '13 at 23:07

I'm kind of surprised that no one suggested a new overload of the method with an argument of type T to simplify the client API.

public void DoSomething<T>(IEnumerable<T> list)
{
    // Do Something
}

public void DoSomething<T>(T item)
{
    DoSomething(new T[] { item });
}

Now your client code can just do this:

MyItem item = new MyItem();
Obj.DoSomething(item);

or with a list:

List<MyItem> itemList = new List<MyItem>();
Obj.DoSomething(itemList);
share|improve this answer
11  
Even better, you could have DoSomething<T>(params T[] items) which means the compiler would handle the conversion from a single item to an array. (This would also allow you to pass in multiple separate items and, again, the compiler would handle converting them to an array for you.) –  LukeH Oct 16 '09 at 13:26

Either (as has previously been said)

MyMethodThatExpectsAnIEnumerable(new[] { myObject });

or

MyMethodThatExpectsAnIEnumerable(Enumerable.Repeat(myObject, 1));

As a side note, the last version can also be nice if you want an empty list of an anonymous object, e.g.

var x = MyMethodThatExpectsAnIEnumerable(Enumerable.Repeat(new { a = 0, b = "x" }, 0));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, although Enumerable.Repeat is new in .Net 3.5. It seems to behave similar to the helper method above. –  Groo Oct 16 '09 at 13:28

As I have just found, and seen that user LukeH suggested too, a nice simple way of doing this is as follows:

public static void PerformAction(params YourType[] items)
{
    // Forward call to IEnumerable overload
    PerformAction(items.AsEnumerable());
}

public static void PerformAction(IEnumerable<YourType> items)
{
    foreach (YourType item in items)
    {
        // Do stuff
    }
}

This pattern will allow you to call the same functionality in a multitude of ways: a single item; multiple items (comma-separated); an array; a list; an enumeration, etc.

I'm not 100% sure on the efficiency of using the AsEnumerable method though, but it does work a treat.

Update: The AsEnumerable function looks pretty efficient! (reference)

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, you don't need .AsEnumerable() at all. Array YourType[] already implements IEnumerable<YourType>. But my question was referring to the case when only the second method (in your example) is available, and you are using .NET 2.0, and you want to pass a single item. –  Groo Nov 10 '10 at 12:08
    
Yes, it does, but you'll find you may get a stack overflow ;-) –  teppicymon Nov 10 '10 at 15:52
    
And to actually answer your real question (not the one I was actually looking to answer for myself!), yeah you pretty much have to convert it to an array as per Mario's answer –  teppicymon Nov 10 '10 at 15:53
2  
How about just defining an IEnumerable<T> MakeEnumerable<T>(params T[] items) {return items;} method? One could then use that with anything that expected an IEnumerable<T>, for any number of discrete items. The code should be essentially as efficient as defining a special class to return a single item. –  supercat Sep 21 '12 at 18:40

IanG has a good post on the topic, suggesting EnumerableFrom() as the name and mentions that the discussion points out that Haskell and Rx call it Return. IIRC F# calls it Return too. F#'s Seq calls the operator singleton<'T>.

Tempting if you're prepared to be C#-centric is to call it Yield [alluding to the yield return involved in realizing it].

If you're interested in the perf aspects of it, James Michael Hare has a returning zero or one items post too which is well worth a scan.

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This may not be any better but it's kind of cool:

Enumerable.Range(0, 1).Select(i => item);
share|improve this answer
    
It's not. It's different. –  nawfal Jun 10 at 10:29

The easiest way I'd say would be new T[]{item};; there's no syntax to do this. The closest equivalent that I can think of is the params keyword, but of course that requires you to have access to the method definition and is only usable with arrays.

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Although it's overkill for one method, I believe some people may find the Interactive Extensions useful.

The Interactive Extensions (Ix) from Microsoft includes the following method.

public static IEnumerable<TResult> Return<TResult>(TResult value)
{
    yield return value;
}

Which can be utilized like so:

var result = EnumerableEx.Return(0);

Ix adds new functionality not found in the original Linq extension methods, and is a direct result of creating the Reactive Extensions (Rx).

Think, Linq Extension Methods + Ix = Rx for IEnumerable.

You can find both Rx and Ix on CodePlex.

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This helper method is works for item or many.

public static IEnumerable<T> ToEnumerable<T>(params T[] items)
{
    return items;
}    
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protected by Travis J Jun 25 '13 at 21:30

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