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I have a sorting algorithm that requires performing an n log n sort n times, with n decrementing by 1 in each step? In other words: I would expect a performance of O(n log n + (n-1) log (n-1) + (n-2) log (n - 2) + ... ). This problem definitely doesn't strike me as something that hasn't been encountered before so I must ask:

What is the order-of-magnitude performance of an n log n sort n times, with n decrementing by 1 in each step?

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3  
Wow, I was surprised to learn that the sum is equal to Log2(H(N)), where H defines hyperfactorial, whatever the heck it is :-) How do I know? Wolfram Alpha to the rescue. –  dasblinkenlight Apr 3 '13 at 3:34
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@RyanDelucchi: This should be helpful: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factorial#Hyperfactorial –  Blender Apr 3 '13 at 3:39
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The link to alpha in my first comment points to the query. –  dasblinkenlight Apr 3 '13 at 3:40
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Ignoring your actual question, why do you have to sort this more than once? Maybe you can use that information to devise a better algorithm for your data? –  Ulrich Eckhardt Apr 3 '13 at 5:45
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The only time I've seen progressive sorting done is with the alias method for storing finite discrete distributions but that sort can actually be replaced with one or two logN insertions. Or there are other even more efficient aliasing methods. –  Daniel Williams Apr 3 '13 at 15:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
Time = SUM { k log k } for k: 1..n = log(H(n)) ~ Θ(log(H(n)))

H(n): Hyper-Factorial function in n

Asymptotic Approximation:

I'll try to deduce f(n) as an approximation for an upper bound, by generalizing k ..

f(n) = log n * SUM { k } for k: 1..n

f(n) = log n * 1/2 n (n+1)

f(n) = 1/2 n log n (n+1)

O(f(n)) = O(1/2 n^2 log n (n+1))

~ O(n^2 log n)

I'll try to deduce g(n) as an approximation for a lower bound, by generalizing log(k) ..

g(n) = n * SUM { log(k) } for k: 1..n

g(n) = n * log(1/2 n(n+1))

g(n) = n * (log(1/2) + log(n) + log(n+1))

g(n) = n * (c + log(n) + log(n+1))

g(n) = n * (c + log(n(n+1)))

Ω(g(n)) = Ω(n * (c + log(n^2+n))) = Ω(n * log(n^2+n))

~ Ω(n log(n^2+n))

So, we have:

Ω(n log(n^2+n)) < Θ(log(H(n))) < O(n^2 log n)

Example:

n = 100; Ω(922.02) < Θ(20,756.7) < O(46,051.7)

n = 1000; Ω(1.38 × 10^4) < Θ(3.2 × 10^6) < O(6.9 × 10^6)

Note: f(n) and g(n) are asymptotic approximation for bounds, they're not accurate ..

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N^2 log(N)

You are doing a NlogN operation N times so N times NlogN is the solution.

Oh after your edit it's quite different. It's very hard to figure out that summation but it's upper bound (which is all big O is) is still N^2 log(N). You may be able to figure out a closer upper bound but I think that would be a viable solution.

See http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/135787/asymptotic-formula-for-the-logarithm-of-the-hyperfactorial for a much more exact solution.

The much more exact solution is still bounded above by N^2 logN (by quite a bit) so I think it is still a safe upper bound.

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Yes, my edit changes things a bit :-) ... I realize that the upper bound is N^2 log N (which sucks). But, I wonder if the "decrement by 1 in each step" causes this to amortize to something much better? –  Ryan Delucchi Apr 3 '13 at 3:33
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+1 The link to math actually shows that n^2 log n is tight in the sense that there is no non-constant factor to get rid off. –  G. Bach Apr 3 '13 at 3:47

It's about 0.5 * n2 * log(n):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

#define MAX 100
double sum[1 + MAX];

int main(void)
{
  int i;

  sum[0] = 0;

  for (i = 1; i <= MAX; i++)
  {
    sum[i] = sum[i - 1] + i * ceil(log2(i));
    printf("%i %.0f %.0f\n", i, sum[i], ceil(log2(i) * i * i / 2));
  }

  return 0;
}

Output (ideone):

1 0 0
2 2 2
3 8 8
4 16 16
5 31 30
6 49 47
7 70 69
8 94 96
9 130 129
10 170 167
...
90 25871 26293
91 26508 26946
92 27152 27608
93 27803 28279
94 28461 28959
95 29126 29647
96 29798 30344
97 30477 31050
98 31163 31764
99 31856 32488
100 32556 33220
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It's Theta(N^2 log N).

It's obviously O(N^2 log N).

To show that it's Omega(N^2 log N), consider only the big half of the sequence, where each value of k is at least N/2. For simplicity, assume that N is even.

Sum[k=1..N](k log k) >= Sum[k=N/2..N](k log k)           ; drop the small half
                     >= Sum[k=N/2..N]((N/2) log (N/2))   ; since each k >= N/2
                     >= N/2 * N/2 * log (N/2)
                      = N^2/4 * (log N - log 2)
                      = N^2/4 * logN - c
                      ∈ Omega(N^2 log N)
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