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I have the following domain object:

public class DomainObject<T,TRepo> 
  where T : DomainObject<T>
  where TRepo : IRepository<T>
{
      public static TRepo Repository { get;private set; }
}

A repository interface:

public interface IRepository<T> //where T : DomainObject<T> // The catch 22
{
    void Save(T domainObject);
}

An implementation of the 2:

public class User : DomainObject<User,MyRepository>
{
    public string Name { get;private set;}
}

public class MyRepository : IRepository<User>
{
    public List<User> UsersWithNameBob()
    {

    }
}

So adding another method that isn't inside IRepository.

I want to enforce the repository as an IRepository while above it could be any type.

A small sidenote: I'm writing this for small systems with very few domain objects. I'm not looking to create anything that uses IoC, but rather something that is easy and simple to consume.

Thanks

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Did you test that you actually have to cast User.Repository? Because you don't have to, it will be of type MyRepository and thus give access to UsersWithNameBob without changes to your code. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Oct 16 '09 at 13:22
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Not exactly sure what you want, but something like this compiles:

public class DomainObject<T, TRepo> 
     where T: DomainObject<T, TRepo> 
     where TRepo: IRepository<T, TRepo>
{
     public static TRepo Repository
     {
         get;
         private set; 
     }
}

public interface IRepository<T, TRepo>
     where T: DomainObject<T, TRepo>
     where TRepo: IRepository<T, TRepo>
{
     void Save(T domainObject);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This was what I was after :) It feels a bit unnatural telling the interface that it is an IRepository, as it's implementing it –  Arec Barrwin Oct 16 '09 at 13:22
    
Well, you did the same thing already with the domain object ;) –  Lucero Oct 16 '09 at 13:44
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Your implementation of DomainObject is only specifying one generic type argument instead of two. Why isn't it:

public class User : DomainObject<User, MyRepository>
{
    public string Name { get;private set;}
}

If that doesn't work, could you explain in what way it doesn't do what you need?

share|improve this answer
    
That was an oversight, fixed it now –  Arec Barrwin Oct 16 '09 at 13:16
    
For the second point, I want to avoid casting to my custom Repository in order to access the additions it provides ontop of IRepository –  Arec Barrwin Oct 16 '09 at 13:17
    
Well I just tested it, and it all seems to work fine. DomainUser.Repository.UsersWithNameBob(); worked out A-OK. –  JustLoren Oct 16 '09 at 13:19
    
You won't need to cast: User.Repository will be of type MyRepository. –  Jon Skeet Oct 16 '09 at 13:19
    
agreed, I dont see the issue at all. –  Lee Treveil Oct 16 '09 at 13:23
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