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Is there anyway for azure to route messages to appropriate handler/operation/subscriber based on the message type?

In NServiceBus, when an event is publishedd, only subscribers that can handle the event will be called. How does Azure service bus achieve this, given that WCF is an RPC framework and is not particularly "message oriented" which tends to have

  1. Handlers that are monadic eg. NServiceBus, ServiceStack and
  2. Messages that are POCO, rather than native.

That being said should I send a message of Type MyMessage, how would the AzureServiceBus know only to pass this message to MyMessageHandler WCF service? I could configure message properties and routing, but that is a real PITA when a simple convention like the one in NServiceBus would have worked really well for 99% of use cases.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the CorrelationFilter in Service Bus for this. By default if you just specify a string then it matches with the CorrelationId property on the message. Alternatively you can specify values for any of the other system properties like ContentType or use your own user Properties for filtering.

Here is a blog post I wrote describing the different types of patterns you can use: http://abhishekrlal.com/2012/02/07/enterprise-integration-patterns-with-service-bus-part-1/

Following is a sample that showcases the use of different filters: http://code.msdn.microsoft.com/windowsazure/Brokered-Messaging-6b0d2749

// Create a topic and 3 subscriptions. 
        TopicDescription topicDescription = namespaceManager.CreateTopic(Program.TopicName); 
        Console.WriteLine("Topic created."); 

        // Create a subscription for all messages sent to topic. 
        namespaceManager.CreateSubscription(topicDescription.Path, SubsNameAllMessages, new TrueFilter()); 
        Console.WriteLine("Subscription {0} added with filter definition set to TrueFilter.", Program.SubsNameAllMessages); 

        // Create a subscription that'll receive all orders which have color "blue" and quantity 10. 
        namespaceManager.CreateSubscription(topicDescription.Path, SubsNameColorBlueSize10Orders, new SqlFilter("color = 'blue' AND quantity = 10")); 
        Console.WriteLine("Subscription {0} added with filter definition \"color = 'blue' AND quantity = 10\".", Program.SubsNameColorBlueSize10Orders); 

        // Create a subscription that'll receive all high priority orders. 
        namespaceManager.CreateSubscription(topicDescription.Path, SubsNameHighPriorityOrders, new CorrelationFilter("high")); 
        Console.WriteLine("Subscription {0} added with correlation filter definition \"high\".", Program.SubsNameHighPriorityOrders); 
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Abhishek, I get that it's very flexible, but it does nothing to make the library user friendly. I can't spend too much time refining the framework to make it useable, that's not where my biz is at. Bottom line is, this is too much code for something that NSB does out of the box. –  Alwyn Apr 3 '13 at 16:35
    
Thanks for posting your answer! Please be sure to read the FAQ on Self-Promotion carefully. Also note that it is required that you post a disclaimer every time you link to your own site/product. –  Andrew Barber Apr 4 '13 at 2:14
    
Thanks Andrew, will do. –  Abhishek Lal Apr 5 '13 at 5:22
    
I'm poring through NServiceBus hoping it'd make things easier. It doesn't, in fact I fairly miffed by the lack of docs and the extreme case of convention over configuration. It's now broken because something in its testing framework tries to dynamically implement System.Reactive - a serious WTH moment. It is trying to be way too smart with regard to certain things sorta like WebForms - and failing. –  Alwyn Apr 14 '13 at 20:37
    
I'm poring through NServiceBus hoping it'd make things easier. It doesn't, in fact I fairly miffed by the lack of docs and the extreme case of convention over configuration. It's now broken because something in its testing framework tries to dynamically implement System.Reactive - a serious WTH moment. It is trying to be way too smart with regard to certain things when it's not - sorta like webforms - too rigid. –  Alwyn Apr 14 '13 at 20:42

Firstly, I would certainly agree with you that routing based on the underlying type should be an out of the box feature of azure SB.

NSB allows routing based on type by exposing a header property on the message called EnclosedMessageTypes.

Because ASB relies on the BrokeredMessage type to enable message routing, which does not expose the contained type as a property by default, I know of no way to enable this kind of routing without promoting the property yourself before sending the message:

myMessage.Properties.Add("type", typeof(myUnderlyingType)); 
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can you show me how to filter for this type? I have seen how you can use SQL against the namespace manager API to configure the routing, but the examples usually use SQL filter. How would I create a subscription based on a type? Thanks! –  Alwyn Apr 3 '13 at 15:43
1  
To filter on it, the type name would have to exist as a string, with assembly details (including version, token, etc) if you needed them, and then have a sqlfilter based on this property. Not helpful I know. Apologies for misleading answer. –  Tom Redfern Apr 4 '13 at 14:35

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