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I'm trying to make an efficient extension method that will allow both locked and concurrent access to the file system based on the generated file name for a data record.

I have read Locking on an interned string?, but it doesn't quite answer my questions with regard to efficiency.

I have an extension method that looks something like this (stripped to only relevant code):

public static string GetImageUrl( this IStoredImage img, string path )
{
    var filename = String.Format( @"{0}\{1}_{2}{3}",
        path, img.Id, img.Version, img.FileExtension );

    //
    // If the file does not exist, create it in a
    // double-checked lock.
    //
    if( !File.Exists( filename ) )
    {
        //
        // Ensure that our string is unique to this method and
        // the file name, and that it is a shared reference.
        //
        var lockStr = StringPool.GetString(
            MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name + filename );

        lock( lockStr )
        {
            if( !File.Exists( filename ) )
            {
                byte[] bytes = img.GetImageBytes();
                //
                // ...Code to write the file to disk
                //
             }
        }
    }

    return GetUrlFromPhysicalPath( filename );
}

IStoredImage is an object that stores header and meta information in the database. The actual binary data of the image is in a 1:1 linked table. GetImageBytes() finishes loading the record with the binary data. The idea of this is to be able to cache images to disk for efficiency. Once the file is written out, GetImageBytes() never needs to be called until the cached directory of images is deleted or cleared out.

StringPool is a static class that ensures that you get the same reference for the same string value, similar to interning but more efficient and controllable.

On to the question: Does using the string as a lock gain me anything in terms of efficiency over simply using a private static object LOCK = new object()? My gut tells me that doing it the way I have it will allow multiple threads that need to write out image data to run concurrently (as long as they are working on different file names), whereas using the same LOCK reference would cause them to run serially.

I've experimented with Mutex and some other things, but you have to be careful because the backslash character in a named Mutex will create havoc. I don't like things that have weird undocumented behavior.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Might your callers be malicious? There can be plenty of ways to produce two different values of path that actually resolve to the same directory... –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 3 '13 at 6:51
    
I suppose I should lowercase everything, this not being UNIX... good point. Malicious caller is highly unlikely. More interested in whether the overall idea is gaining me anything. –  Bruce Pierson Apr 3 '13 at 7:02
    
It's not just case - NTFS supports links - so "D:\ABC" could also be the same directory as "C:\DEF" –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 3 '13 at 7:05

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