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I am confused by this bit of Perldoc:

If FILEHANDLE is omitted, prints to the last selected (see select) output handle. http://perldoc.perl.org/functions/print.html

It seems to say that a naked print statement, after writing to a filehandle, will print to that filehandle. I wrote a script to test this...

#!/usr/bin/perl

open (FILE, '>', 'PrintTest.txt') or die $!;
print FILE "Hello world!\n";
print "Hello.... hello? hello world!\n"; 
close FILE;

But the test shows otherwise.

$ perl PrintTest.pl
Hello.... hello? hello world!

We're writing to STDOUT here, not FILE, which is probably the most sensible result, but seems contrary to that line of Perldoc quoted above. Perhaps I am misunderstanding what "last selected output handle" means? That is the only way I can think to explain this :-p

Thanks in advance ~ ktm

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Hm, think I answered my question. It must be that opening/writing to a file doesn't select the file; rather, explicitly invoking select selects the new default filehandle. I'll leave this open anyway... –  ktm5124 Apr 3 '13 at 6:25
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It seems to say that a naked print statement, after writing to a filehandle, will print to that filehandle.

No, it says it will print to the last selected handle, not the last handle to which you printed. It proceeds to instruct you to read this page to see how to do it.

open (FILE, '>', 'PrintTest.txt') or die $!;
print FILE "Hello world!\n";
select(FILE);                              <----- Missing
print "Hello.... hello? hello world!\n"; 
close FILE;
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I believe a SELECT statement is required to change the default handle from stdout to another. Then, the selected handle remains in use until changed.

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