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I've installed GCC 4.8 using this method on my Mac. Everything works fine except that for certain functions like scanf and printf, the program compiles fine without any error/warning even when I did not include their respective libraries like cstdio. Is there any way that I can do to for GCC (more specifically G++, as I am dealing with C++ programs) to throw an error when such code is being fed? The following code compiles fine on my machine:

#include <iostream> 
//Notice I did not include cstdio but my program uses printf later on
int main()
{
    printf("Hello World!\n");
    return 0;
}

I was given the suggestion to use -Werror-implicit-function-declaration -Werror or -Wall -Werror, but they don't work.

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The problem is that you don't have an implicit function declaration, but that <iostream> is importing the printf function declaration. –  juanchopanza Apr 3 '13 at 6:48
1  
@juanchopanza No, the real problem is that OP asked a misleading question, and he is treating C/C++ as one language. –  user529758 Apr 3 '13 at 6:50
    
@juanchopanza Yeah, I was suspecting something like this. Is there a way to force GCC not to do that? 'cause usually I will share my code with other people and they can't compile it. –  yihangho Apr 3 '13 at 6:50
3  
The <iostream> header might include <cstdio> or <stdio.h> for you; in C++, that is allowed. You aren't allowed to call an undeclared function in C++, so printf() must have been declared. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 3 '13 at 6:51
    
@H2CO3 nope. The problem is what I said :-) –  juanchopanza Apr 3 '13 at 6:52

3 Answers 3

-Wimplicit-function-declaration -Werror works for me. There must be some other problems as well.

h2co3-macbook:~ h2co3$ cat baz.c
#ifndef BAILZ_OUT
#include <stdio.h>
#endif

int main()
{
    printf("Hello world!\n");
    return 0;
}
h2co3-macbook:~ h2co3$ gcc -o baz baz.c -Wimplicit-function-declaration -Werror
h2co3-macbook:~ h2co3$ echo $?
0
h2co3-macbook:~ h2co3$ gcc -o baz baz.c -Wimplicit-function-declaration -Werror -DBAILZ_OUT
cc1: warnings being treated as errors
baz.c: In function ‘main’:
baz.c:7: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘printf’
baz.c:7: warning: incompatible implicit declaration of built-in function ‘printf’
h2co3-macbook:~ h2co3$ echo $?
1
h2co3-macbook:~ h2co3$ 
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It doesn't work for me: cc1plus: warning: command line option '-Wimplicit-function-declaration' is valid for C/ObjC but not for C++ [enabled by default] –  yihangho Apr 3 '13 at 6:48
1  
It depends what you mean by "works". It doesn't "work" for me. Note OP is including <iostream>, which, on my gcc 4.8 snapshot, seems to include the printf declaration. –  juanchopanza Apr 3 '13 at 6:48
    
Simply -Wall should warn you everything, and It gives me the warning for the printf. –  Robert Bean Apr 3 '13 at 6:50
1  
A trifle pointless...yes...we have to do the best we can with what the questioners ask. C J Date sometimes invokes the 'Principle of Incoherence': it is difficult to criticize coherently that which is inherently incoherent. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 3 '13 at 6:55
3  
@H2CO3 For me, the most common case of "compiler C with a C+ compiler" would be on Windows with MSVC. The MSVC C compiler sucks balls like nobody's bushiness. So the next best thing is to use the C++ compiler. –  Mysticial Apr 3 '13 at 6:58

The reason you get no diagnostic is that <iostream> is including the declaration of printf, which it seems to do with the c++0x or c++11 flags.

This compiles on a gcc 4.8 snapshot with the following command line:

g++ -Wall -Wextra -pedantic-errors -std=c++0x

#include <iostream>
int main()
{
    printf("Hello World!\n");
    return 0;
}

If you comment out the <iostream> include, or remove the C++11 compilation flags, you get an error.

impl_decl.cpp: In function 'int main()':

impl_decl.cpp:5:28: error: 'printf' was not declared in this scope

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From the Annex C/Compatibility of the C++ standard from 2003:

C.1 C++ and ISO C:

C.1.3 Clause 5: expressions [diff.expr]
5.2.2
Change: Implicit declaration of functions is not allowed
Rationale: The type-safe nature of C++.

That means that implicit declarations must cause a compilation error in C++.

I'm guessing you're compiling not C++ files, but C files and you're doing that in some pre-C99 mode, which is the default in gcc. The C standard from 1999 disallows implicit declarations as well.

You may want to pass to gcc a combination of these options: -std=c99 -Werror.

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The sample code almost has to be C++; the #include <iostream> is not a standard C header, at any rate. The question is confusing and/or confused. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 3 '13 at 6:56
    
@JonathanLeffler It's not uncommon for questions to not have the actual code in them. –  Alexey Frunze Apr 3 '13 at 6:57

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