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I'm using the [DLLImport] attribute to access a bunch of C++ functions in my .NET code. For now, I have all the functions in the following way:

const string DLL_Path = "path\\to\\my\\dll.dll";

[DllImport(DLL_Path, 
    CallingConvention = CallingConvention.StdCall, 
    CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)] 
public static extern int MyFunction1();

[DllImport(DLL_Path, 
    CallingConvention = CallingConvention.StdCall, 
    CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]
public static extern ErrorCode MyFunction2(int id);

[DllImport(DLL_Path, 
    CallingConvention = CallingConvention.StdCall, 
    CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]
public static extern ErrorCode MyFunction3(string server, byte timeout, 
    ref int connection_id, ref DeviceInfo pInfos);

[DllImport(DLL_Path, 
    CallingConvention = CallingConvention.StdCall,
    CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]
public static extern ErrorCode MyFunction4([MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPArray)] byte[] pVersion, 
    ref int psize);

[DllImport(DLL_Path, 
    CallingConvention = CallingConvention.StdCall, 
    CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]
public static extern ErrorCode MyFunction5(int errorcode, 
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPTStr)] string pmsg, ref int psize);

Which is rather not pleasing to the eye: the repetition of attributes seems unefficient and destroys readability for the prototypes of the functions. Especially since I have something like 20 or 30 functions to import.

I wonder if I could have the [DllImport(DLL_Path, CallingConvention = CallingConvention.StdCall, CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)] part only once somewhere and have the function definitions more clearly identified, like this pseudo code:

const string DLL_Path = "path\\to\\my\\dll.dll";
// some code defining a section which tells that the next functions are DLLImport
[DllImport(DLL_Path, CallingConvention = CallingConvention.StdCall, CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)] 
{
    public static extern int MyFunction1();

    public static extern ErrorCode MyFunction2(int id);

    public static extern ErrorCode MyFunction3(string server, byte timeout, ref int connection_id, ref DeviceInfo pInfos);

    public static extern ErrorCode MyFunction4([MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPArray)] byte[] pVersion, ref int psize);

    public static extern ErrorCode MyFunction5(int errorcode, [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPTStr)] string pmsg, ref int psize);
}

Is this possible?
I found this question in SO: Shorten amount of DllImport in C#? but it suggests dynamically loading the functions through LoadLibrary and GetProcAddress, which I find less readable.

share|improve this question
    
The answer is no, stick with what you have, pleasing to the eye or not. –  Phil Apr 3 '13 at 7:47
    
Man that's mean! Don't you want to change the order of things sometimes? Or do you stick to what you have and don't ever dream of a world where it's easier and prettier to import DLL functions? –  Gui13 Sep 23 '13 at 7:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, there's no way to reduce the Attributes to a single declaration. You'll need to apply the Attribute to all methods.

But you can at least shorten your Attribute declarations to [DllImport(DLL_Path)], because the values you are specifying for CallingConvention and CharSet are the same as the default values.

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That's good enough for me, I'll put them in front of the declaration so that it's easier to read. I miss an "Attribute scope" though... it would be a nice addition! –  Gui13 Apr 3 '13 at 7:59

You can spend one day or some hours, or how much time it needs, and start a new class library project in C#, and name it "Pinvoke" or "API", or any name you'll like to call it. This can be the name of the class library project and the name of the namespace as well. There will be at least 1 namespace (or more than 1 if you want, but not necessary), and in this or these namespace(s), you will define static classes that their name will be similar to the name of the dll, and his static methods will be exactly these implemented in the dll. This project must using System and System.Runtime.InteropServices namespaces in order to use platform invoke and DllImport attribute. You can copy and paste each function from the site www.pinvoke.net to ease you and avoid the need write each extern method by your hands in your class library project. Note that there are functions that use structures that are not defined in System namespace, so you'll have to define them in your class library project, but still no need to write them all by your hand. pinvoke.net has links to the defined structures that the function above these links uses. Just click them, and you'll be brought to the definition of these structs. Ctrl+A, Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V in your class library project on right place. When you have finished your class library project, you can in other project add reference to the dll file that the class library project has created for you in your computer (in the folder of the class library project that you chose where to locate it). After you've added the dll to your project, you only need using Pinvoke or using API or using the name you chose for the namespace, and you'll be able to point the name of the dll as a static class and invoke the desired function that was implemented in that dll. After this class library project painstaking work, your life with pinvoke is much easy then!

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MMMhhh okay? TL;DR: stick it up my butt and stop whining? –  Gui13 Sep 23 '13 at 7:38

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