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I have a snaphot view on linux and trying to update it, but i'm getting error like this.

cleartool: Unable to access "/vobs/myvob/myfolderinvob": database timed out

Does anyone can suggest what to do.

Clearcase 7.1.2, Kubuntu 12.10 x86_64

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That specific error message can appear because of a Lock Manager issue (on the Vob Server side).
From this doc:

The Lock Manager manages lock requests from any process that needs to access a VOB database.
Actually, there are only two of those:

  • db_server,
  • vobrpc_server,

There's only one lockmgr process per VOB server, no matter how many VOBs you have on the server.
And the Lock Manager has various limits that are defined when it's started, via the command line or via a registry value for file tables (the -f parameter), user tables (the -u parameter), or queue tables (the -q parameter).

  • The -f parameter indirectly determines how many VOBs can be accessed on a system at any one time.
    VOB databases have 7 files each (3 data files and 4 key files) in the VOB storage area db subdirectory.
    The default -f value of 256 files means that there can be 36 VOBs (256 divided by 7) on a server without modification.
    If you have more than 36 VOBs on a server and you haven't modified this, you might encounter problems such as poor end-user response while waiting for locks, and various error messages in the log file.
    Try increasing the -f parameter to increase the size of the lockmgr process. There's no practical limit to the size of the file table, but we recommend that you set the value to 7 times the number of VOBs you're going to have on the system.

  • The -u parameter determines the maximum number of db_server and vobrpc_server processes that can request locks from the Lock Manager.
    Again, the default value is 256.
    Typically, there's only going to be one active db_server process for each active client ClearCase command. This parameter essentially limits the amount of concurrent ClearCase activity, no matter how many VOBs are on the system. Again, you'll see poor end-user response and "lock manager is busy" errors if the -u parameter is set too low.

  • The -q parameter determines how many lock requests can be queued by the Lock Manager at any one time. The default is 1024.
    Again, you'll see poor end-user response and "database timed out" messages in the log file if this parameter is set too low.
    To resolve the problem, we recommend you increase the -q parameter to up to five times the value of the -u parameter (although in actuality there's no upper bound), because the db_server process usually requests a lock for five database files in one request.

For more on how to tweak those values, see "Supplement to the Administrator's Guide about the Lock Manager".

For a Unix Vob server:

The ability to have different parameters for each VOB on the system as well as a locally-specified override for server-wide settings is now possible through use of a configuration file called vob_almd_params.

NOTE: Although it is possible to set up per VOB almd parameters, we recommend that instead you use only the per server wide settings in /opt/rational/clearcase/config/vob/db.

  • The vob_almd_params server wide configuration file is located in the /opt/rational/clearcase/config/vob/db directory and controls the settings for all VOBs on the host.
  • The vob_almd_params files in the individual VOB db directory (<vob-storage-dir>/db/vob_almd_params) will modify the settings for that individual VOB, rather than all VOBs on a host.

Note: The parameter values can be lower than the ones used in previous releases.

The syntax employed within the vob_almd_params file:

–u num –q num 
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