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Is there anyway to loop through a table variable in T-SQL?

DECLARE @table1 TABLE ( col1 int )  
INSERT into @table1 SELECT col1 FROM table2

I use cursors as well, but cursors seem less flexible than table variables.

DECLARE cursor1 CURSOR  
    FOR SELECT col1 FROM table2  
OPEN cursor1  
FETCH NEXT FROM cursor1

I would like to be able to use a table variable in the same manner as a cursor. That way I could execute some query on the table variable in one part of the procedure, and then later execute some code for each row in the table variable.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

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similar question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/61967/… –  demp Jan 10 '13 at 11:10
1  
"cursors seem less flexible than table variables". This statement doesn't really make sense. They are entirely different things. You can certainly use a cursor to iterate through a table variable. –  Martin Smith Oct 20 '13 at 18:43

8 Answers 8

up vote 33 down vote accepted

Add an identity to your table variable, and do an easy loop from 1 to the @@ROWCOUNT of the INSERT-SELECT.

Try this:

DECLARE @RowsToProcess  int
DECLARE @CurrentRow     int
DECLARE @SelectCol1     int

DECLARE @table1 TABLE (RowID int not null primary key identity(1,1), col1 int )  
INSERT into @table1 (col1) SELECT col1 FROM table2
SET @RowsToProcess=@@ROWCOUNT

SET @CurrentRow=0
WHILE @CurrentRow<@RowsToProcess
BEGIN
    SET @CurrentRow=@CurrentRow+1
    SELECT 
        @SelectCol1=col1
        FROM @table1
        WHERE RowID=@CurrentRow

    --do your thing here--

END
share|improve this answer
2  
This seems like the simplest of the lot. Thanks! –  Kuyenda Oct 16 '09 at 14:45
DECLARE @table1 TABLE (
    idx int identity(1,1),
    col1 int )

DECLARE @counter int

SET @counter = 1

WHILE(@counter < SELECT MAX(idx) FROM @table1)
BEGIN
    DECLARE @colVar INT

    SELECT @colVar = col1 FROM @table1 WHERE idx = @counter

    -- Do your work here

    SET @counter = @counter + 1
END

Believe it or not, this is actually more efficient and performant than using a cursor.

share|improve this answer
    
why select the max each time in the loop? –  KM. Oct 16 '09 at 14:03
    
You could select it once and store it in a variable easily enough...this was just a few keystrokes shorter. –  Justin Niessner Oct 16 '09 at 14:13
1  
why select the max each time in the loop? As a result, you have to hit the table variable two times per iteration. You could remove the SELECT MAX() in the WHILE() if you capture the @@ROWCOUNT from the table varaible population, like I do in my answer. –  KM. Oct 16 '09 at 14:13

You can loop through the table variable or you can cursor through it. This is what we usually call a RBAR - pronounced Reebar and means Row-By-Agonizing-Row.

I would suggest finding a SET-BASED answer to your question (we can help with that) and move away from rbars as much as possible.

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This is actually why I want to use a table variable instead of a cursor. I generally look for a way to get my intended result using a JOIN on a table variable, but if I can't find a way to use a JOIN, then I can fall back on a loop on that same table variable. But I agree, set-based is best. –  Kuyenda Oct 16 '09 at 14:16
    
Looping on a table variable is no better than a cursor. In fact, it can actually be worse. The only real benefit of changing code from cursors to loops is "bragging rights". Ex: "I don't have any cursors in my code". –  G Mastros Jun 6 '13 at 15:13

Here's another answer, similar to Justin's, but doesn't need an identity or aggregate, just a primary (unique) key.

declare @table1 table(dataKey int, dataCol1 varchar(20), dataCol2 datetime)
declare @dataKey int
while exists select 'x' from @table1
begin
    select top 1 @dataKey = dataKey 
    from @table1 
    order by /*whatever you want:*/ dataCol2 desc

    -- do processing

    delete from @table1 where dataKey = @dataKey
end
share|improve this answer
    
each iteration you hit the table variable 3 times, which can't be that efficient –  KM. Oct 16 '09 at 14:10

Here's my variant. Pretty much just like all the others, but I only use one variable to manage the looping.

DECLARE
  @LoopId  int
 ,@MyData  varchar(100)

DECLARE @CheckThese TABLE
 (
   LoopId  int  not null  identity(1,1)
  ,MyData  varchar(100)  not null
 )


INSERT @CheckThese (YourData)
 select MyData from MyTable
 order by DoesItMatter

SET @LoopId = @@rowcount

WHILE @LoopId > 0
 BEGIN
    SELECT @MyData = MyData
     from @CheckThese
     where LoopId = @LoopId

    --  Do whatever

    SET @LoopId = @LoopId - 1
 END

Raj More's point is relevant--only perform loops if you have to.

share|improve this answer

look like this demo:

DECLARE @vTable TABLE (IdRow int not null primary key identity(1,1),ValueRow int);

-------Initialize---------
insert into @vTable select 345;
insert into @vTable select 795;
insert into @vTable select 565;
---------------------------

DECLARE @cnt int = 1;
DECLARE @max int = (SELECT MAX(IdRow) FROM @vTable);

WHILE @cnt <= @max
BEGIN
    DECLARE @tempValueRow int = (Select ValueRow FROM @vTable WHERE IdRow = @cnt);

    ---work demo----
    print '@tempValueRow:' + convert(varchar(10),@tempValueRow);
    print '@cnt:' + convert(varchar(10),@cnt);
    print'';
    --------------

    set @cnt = @cnt+1;
END

Version without idRow, using ROW_NUMBER

    DECLARE @vTable TABLE (ValueRow int);
-------Initialize---------
insert into @vTable select 345;
insert into @vTable select 795;
insert into @vTable select 565;
---------------------------

DECLARE @cnt int = 1;
DECLARE @max int = (select count(*) from @vTable);

WHILE @cnt <= @max
BEGIN
    DECLARE @tempValueRow int = (
        select ValueRow 
        from (select ValueRow
            , ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY (select 1)) as RowId 
            from @vTable
        ) T1 
    where t1.RowId = @cnt
    );

    ---work demo----
    print '@tempValueRow:' + convert(varchar(10),@tempValueRow);
    print '@cnt:' + convert(varchar(10),@cnt);
    print'';
    --------------

    set @cnt = @cnt+1;
END
share|improve this answer

I didn't know about the WHILE structure.

The WHILE structure with a table variable, however, looks similar to using a CURSOR, in that you still have to SELECT the row into a variable based on the row IDENTITY, which is effectively a FETCH.

Is there any difference between using WHERE and something like the following?

DECLARE @table1 TABLE ( col1 int )  
INSERT into @table1 SELECT col1 FROM table2

DECLARE cursor1 CURSOR  
    FOR @table1
OPEN cursor1  
FETCH NEXT FROM cursor1

I don't know if that's even possible. I suppose you might have to do this:

DECLARE cursor1 CURSOR  
    FOR SELECT col1 FROM @table1
OPEN cursor1  
FETCH NEXT FROM cursor1

Thanks for you help!

share|improve this answer
    
your code: DECLARE cursor1 CURSOR FOR @table1 OPEN cursor1 will not work. Cursors have to have a SELECT in their definition, like your second code example. If you do some tests, you will find that looping without using a cursor is faster than looping using a cursor. –  KM. Oct 16 '09 at 18:05

Here is my version of the same solution...

    declare @id int

        SELECT @id = min(fPat.PatientID)
        FROM tbPatients fPat
        WHERE (fPat.InsNotes is not null AND DataLength(fPat.InsNotes)>0)

while @id is not null
begin
    SELECT fPat.PatientID, fPat.InsNotes
    FROM tbPatients fPat
    WHERE (fPat.InsNotes is not null AND DataLength(fPat.InsNotes)>0) AND fPat.PatientID=@id

    SELECT @id = min(fPat.PatientID)
    FROM tbPatients fPat
    WHERE (fPat.InsNotes is not null AND DataLength(fPat.InsNotes)>0)AND fPat.PatientID>@id

end
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