Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I want to run a cuda program, but I am a beginner. I have to write a program for a histogram. But with buckets. Depending on the maxValue(40 in the example) the number will be added to the appropriate bucket. If we have 4 buckets:

histo: | 1 | 10 | 30 | 39 | 32 | 2 | 4 | 5 | 1 |

0-9 (1st bucket)

10-19(2nd bucket)

20-29(3rd bucket)

30- 39(4th bucket)

My GPU has Compute Capability 1.1.

I was trying to do something like having a shared temp[] for a block that each thread is adding his values on his temp table:

__global__ void histo_kernel_optimized5( unsigned char *buffer, long size,
                               unsigned int *histo )
{
     extern __shared__ unsigned int temp[];
     temp[threadIdx.x] = 0;
     __syncthreads();

     int i = threadIdx.x + blockIdx.x * blockDim.x;
     int offset = blockDim.x * gridDim.x;
     int bucketID;
     while (i < size)
     {
              bucketID = array[i]/Bwidth;
              atomicAdd( &temp[bucketID], 1);
              i += offset;
     }
     __syncthreads();


    atomicAdd( &(histo[threadIdx.x]), temp[threadIdx.x] );
}

histo_kernel_optimized <<<array_size/buckets, buckets,buckets*sizeof(unsigned int)>>>(buffer,SIZE, histogram)

But the compiler sais: Instruction '{atom,red}.shared' requires .target sm_12 or higher

I also tried have a temp table for each thread created:

__global__ void histo_kernel_optimized5( unsigned char *buffer, long size,
                               unsigned int *histo )
{
    unsigned int temp[buckets];
     int j;
    for (j=0;j<buckets;j++){
        temp[j]=0;
    }

    int bucketID;

    int i = threadIdx.x + blockIdx.x * blockDim.x;
    int offset = blockDim.x * gridDim.x;
    while (i < size)
    {
        bucketID = array[i]/Bwidth;
        temp[bucketID]++;
        i += offset;
    }


    for (j=0;j<buckets;j++){
        histo[j] += temp[j];    
    }
 }

But compiler don't let me to do it as it needs a constant to create the temp table. But the problem says that buckets are dynamically given for the command line.

Is there another way to do it? I don't know how to do it. I am confused.

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

When using atomics, launching fewer blocks will reduce contention (and hence improve performance) because it will not have to coordinate between fewer blocks. Launch fewer blocks and have each block loop over more of the input elements.

for (unsigned tid = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x+threadIdx.x; 
              tid < size; tid += gridDim.x*blockDim.x) {
    unsigned char value = array[tid]; // borrowing notation from another answer here
    int bin = value % buckets;
    atomicAdd(&histo[bin],1);
}
share|improve this answer

Histogram is really easy to implement using atomic operations. I don't know why you are writing such a complex kernel. The motivation to parallelize the operation is to exploit the parallel nature of algorithm. There is no need to iterate over the entire histogram inside the kernel. Here is a sample CUDA kernel and wrapper function to calculate the histogram of an array with specified number of bins. I don't think it can be further optimized for Compute 1.1 devices. But for Compute 1.2, shared memory can be utilized.

__global__ void kernel_getHist(unsigned char* array, long size, unsigned int* histo, int buckets)
{
    int tid = blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;

    if(tid>=size)   return;

    unsigned char value = array[tid];

    int bin = value % buckets;

    atomicAdd(&histo[bin],1);
}

void getHist(unsigned char* array, long size, unsigned int* histo,int buckets)
{
    unsigned char* dArray;
    cudaMalloc(&dArray,size);
    cudaMemcpy(dArray,array,size,cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);

    unsigned int* dHist;
    cudaMalloc(&dHist,buckets * sizeof(int));
    cudaMemset(dHist,0,buckets * sizeof(int));

    dim3 block(32);
    dim3 grid((size + block.x - 1)/block.x);

    kernel_getHist<<<grid,block>>>(dArray,size,dHist,buckets);

    cudaMemcpy(histo,dHist,buckets * sizeof(int),cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);

    cudaFree(dArray);
    cudaFree(dHist);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why you are adding one block size to the size : grid((size + block.x - 1)/block.x); – Andreas Lympouras Apr 3 '13 at 14:50
    
So that the total number of threads is atleast equal to the size. This formula rounds up the total number of threads to multiple of block size greater than or equal to size. Choose a value of size and calculate the total number of threads to see for yourself. – sgarizvi Apr 3 '13 at 14:57
    
yes, you are right! But I don't get the same results, the parallel histogram[] and the serial histogram[] are different! I don't know why, I used your code as it is! – Andreas Lympouras Apr 3 '13 at 15:47

There is a solution for devices without Atomic Operations and shows a approach to minimize onchip memory collisions, with subdivisions into warps proproused by Podlozhnyuk at Histogram calculation in CUDA

The code is at CUDASamples\3_Imaging\histogram (from CUDA Samples)

share|improve this answer
2  
From the Help Center: Links to external resources are encouraged, but please add context around the link so your fellow users will have some idea what it is and why it’s there. Always quote the most relevant part of an important link, in case the target site is unreachable or goes permanently offline. – Adam May 29 at 16:44
    
The context: There is a solution for devices without Atomic Operations and shows a approach to minimize onchip memory collisions, with subdivisions into warps. – Vagner Gon Jun 4 at 18:02
1  
It wasn't me who voted down. Actually, my comment has 2 votes up so I guess it was useful. – Adam Jun 4 at 18:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.