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I have a string:

my $str = "asd na ann nna aannaa NA 10012 3212and123 complan-boy 
           NANANANA n/a n/a nn/a na/a n/a/a";

I am trying to write a regexp that will remove everything other than numbers and N/A or NA.

For this I need to make negative of this regexp as /(n\/a|na|\d+)/i.

I tried this regexp:

s/[^(na|n\/a|\d+)]//gi

which finally boils down to this:

s/[^\d+na()\/|]//ig;

What do I do?

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1  
Instead of removal, how about matching what you want instead? –  nhahtdh Apr 3 '13 at 9:04
    
The square brackets [] define a character class, not a whole match. –  Neil Slater Apr 3 '13 at 9:04
    
@nhahtdh: If we can match, why can't we replace! –  Krishnachandra Sharma Apr 3 '13 at 9:06
1  
@KrishnachandraSharma: Replace means matching the complement set, which is not always easy to do. –  nhahtdh Apr 3 '13 at 9:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One simple approach is to find any stuff that is followed by n/a or digits (or the end of the string), then replace it with only the n/a or digits portion.

use warnings;
use strict;

my $str = "asd na ann nna aannaa NA 10012 3212and123 complan-boy 
           NANANANA n/a n/a nn/a na/a n/a/a";

$str =~ s#.*?(n/?a|\d+|\z)#$1#gis;

print $str;

/s enables single-line mode, allowing .* to match across newlines.

In general, negative matches in regexes tend to be quite difficult. Most negative match problems can actually be expressed as a positive match, and doing so is usually simpler.

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This gave me 100123212123n/an/an/an/a/a. This contains extra /a at the end. –  Krishnachandra Sharma Apr 3 '13 at 9:07
2  
$str =~ s#.*?(n/?a|\d+|\z)#$1#gis; ? –  Neil Slater Apr 3 '13 at 9:08
    
@Neil: that worked, please make it an answer. –  Krishnachandra Sharma Apr 3 '13 at 9:11
1  
@dan1111 did the work, it's just a small fix . . . –  Neil Slater Apr 3 '13 at 9:11
    
@dan1111: Don't we need \z as suggested by @neil slater? –  Krishnachandra Sharma Apr 3 '13 at 9:12

As pointed out in some comments, the elegant way is to take what you want to keep, and forget about the rest:

use Test::More tests => 1;
my $str = "asd na ann nna aannaa NA 10012 3212and123 complan-boy 
           NANANANA n/a n/a nn/a na/a n/a/a";
my $replaced = join '' => $str =~ m{n/?a|\d+}gi;
is $replaced, 'nananaNA100123212123NANANANAn/an/an/anan/a';

I find this quite simple and maintainable in comparision with complex lookarounds. All you have to know is that in list context, a global regex match that doesn't define capture groups returns a list of all matched substrings. E.g. "foo" =~ /o/g would evaluate to "o", "o" in list context.
This list is concatenated and then represents the desired output.

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s/[^na\d]|n(?!\/?a)|(?<!n)(?<!n\/)a//ig

Note: I don't think you can replace (?<!n)(?<!n\/) by (?<!n\/?) but you could try.

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This removes the / from n/a. –  dan1111 Apr 3 '13 at 9:08

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