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I need an advice.

I'm developing a web application written in PHP with a few entity but a lot of (by number and type of) relation.

Simple examples:

  • Entities: 4
  • Possible relations ManyToMany and OneToMany and OneToOne: dozen

Today, it make sense to continue to use to mapping the relations an RDMS like MySql or is better use a graph database like OrientdDb,or a document-oriented db like MongoDb?

I think it is better to work with the entities in mysql and the relationships between entities in OrientDb or MongoDb. During insertion of the entity I can replicate some of its data to manage relations avoiding dozens of joins between tables avoid huge indexes and with faster insert/update in Mysql.

I'm doing wrong?

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closed as not constructive by deceze, WiredPrairie, andrewsi, legoscia, thaJeztah Apr 3 '13 at 19:37

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Maybe it would be better to provide some more info, how it is that you need dozens of joins when you have only a few entities (how many few??) Anyway, as for joins and mongo, usually my mind goes to embedded information under a document –  Melsi Apr 3 '13 at 9:42
    
with 'Entity' I mean some like Cities, Users, Events, Locations.... with relations all of possible relations between this entities... (user can go to a N cities, user can live in one city, user can go to an event, user went to more events, user like...) ok I am a bit 'generic but I think you understand what I mean right? –  vincenzodb Apr 3 '13 at 9:49
    
Okay I see, know what an entity is, ER design etc, I just was curious, about the "dozens of joins".. you don't usually need to join more than 2-3 or 4 tables (usually). Anyway I would suggest that you study a bit the weaknesses and strengths of each system so you can see how they can apply to your project. Personally have used mysql in the past and now I am in love with Mongo, so my opinion can not be objective. However, I still insist you study your self the basic of each server, especially how the manage joins (which is what interests you the most) –  Melsi Apr 3 '13 at 16:39

2 Answers 2

First of all, I think you should not approach the problem considering the sheer number of relations, but their nature. Then you could choose your right technology.

A more detailed depiction of your domain could help giving you a good advice. Anyway I could state these two things:

  1. Don't use mongo for relations! If there is a thing Mongo is NOT designed to manage, it's relations.
  2. If you plan to use Orient to manage graph relations and you don't need a lot of normal relations also (normal in nature, I mean), don't bother using MySQL and Orient: go for Orient alone.

And of course, keep in mind that MySQL is a no-brainer for hosting solutions, Mongo is getting some momentum (ObjectRocket and ServerGrove both provide cloud mongo services out of the box, but you'll have an hard time finding mongo on a "cheap" shared hosting), while for Orient I think you'll have to head towards a dedicated server/cloud instance and configuring the service by yourself.

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Tnx @StickGrinder , I have considerated the number of relations because a relation = a join and a lot of joins is more expensive... I can't enter more in detail but on my normal listing of data I can have dozen of relation per item listed. I would like to use the best technology to manage relationships, which are the heart of my application (especially for sorting the data) with the lowest possible load and the ability to optimize the growth of the application in the easiest way. I asked these things because I do not know almost nothing mongodb and orient :) –  vincenzodb Apr 3 '13 at 10:01
    
OrientDB hosting is offered by NuvolaBase.com or consider to install you own server everywhere on the Cloud (it's Java) –  Lvca Apr 3 '13 at 16:07

Your question is vague however, I believe I can provide some pointers which might be of help.

First off to contradict @StickGrinder:

Don't use mongo for relations! If there is a thing Mongo is NOT designed to manage, it's relations.

MongoDB can handle relationships perfectly fine it is all about how you see relations as being managed.

In fact MongoDB can handle relationships as well as an RDBMS in some scenarios, of course, an RDBMS rules over MongoDB for server-side referential integrity but then this is something that you will need to judge; as to whether this actually means something to you.

As for hosting solutions MySQL is not actually that much liked, it is true that SQL has more easily provided instances however, MySQL is still a technology you can only get in basic forms most of the time and trust me, you don't want to host your data on these services. AWS has recently launched a fully scalable instance of MySQL so that could be something to look into.

MongoDB has a lot of providers from MongoLabs to ObjectRocket and many web hosting providers (such as AWS and Heroku) provide easy access to MongoDB packages. On AWS you can get full cloud templates that will pre-setup a cheap (compared to how much it should cost to host) cluster for replica shards.

So hosting isn't really a problem, if you need it you can quickly get to it.

Today, it make sense to continue to use to mapping the relations an RDMS like MySql or is better use a graph database like OrientdDb,or a document-oriented db like MongoDb?

This statement and lack of observation further on leads me to believe your question lacks research.

A graph database is really powerful at mapping a particular type of relation, more specifically social relations between individuals on a network, whereas a RDBMS like MySQL is good at mapping all relations but is not the best at all.

I think it is better to work with the entities in mysql and the relationships between entities in OrientDb or MongoDb

Why have separate techs? Just go for MySQL if that is what your compfortable with. MySQL will more than accomodate for your needs.

During insertion of the entity I can replicate some of its data to manage relations avoiding dozens of joins between tables avoid huge indexes and with faster insert/update in Mysql.

Splitting up your techs will give you what is known as a "operational hairball". This can come in the form of keeping consistency between the systems, something you will have to manage.

If you need quick accession of objects for display or whatever then just store a cache of them in memcached or something if you really need to, I think you are looking at this wrong by splitting up your techs.

That's a few pointers.

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