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I'm experimenting with Protocol Buffers in an existing, fairly vanilla Maven 2 project. Currently, I invoke a shell script every time I need to update my generated sources. This is obviously a hassle, as I would like the sources to be generated automatically before each build. Hopefully without resorting to shameful hackery.

So, my question is two-fold:

  1. Long shot: is there a "Protocol Buffers plugin" for Maven 2 that can achieve the above in an automagic way? There's a branch on Google Code whose author appears to have taken a shot at implementing such a plugin. Unfortunately, it hasn't passed code review or been merged into protobuf trunk. The status of that plugin is thus unknown.

  2. Probably more realistic: lacking an actual plugin, how else might I go about invoking protoc from my Maven 2 build? I suppose I may be able to wire up my existing shell script into an antrun invocation or something similar.

Personal experiences are most appreciated.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 34 down vote accepted

You'll find some information about the plugin available in the Protocol Buffers repository in the Protocol Buffers Compiler Maven Plug-In thread on the Protocol Buffers discussion group. My understanding is that it's usable but lacking tests. I'd give it a try.

Or you could just use the antrun plugin (snipet pasted from the thread mentioned above):

 <build>
   <plugins>
     <plugin>
       <artifactId>maven-antrun-plugin</artifactId>
       <executions>
         <execution>
           <id>generate-sources</id>
           <phase>generate-sources</phase>
           <configuration>
             <tasks>
               <mkdir dir="target/generated-sources"/>
               <exec executable="protoc">
                 <arg value="--java_out=target/generated-sources"/>
                 <arg value="src/main/protobuf/test.proto"/>
               </exec>
             </tasks>
             <sourceRoot>target/generated-sources</sourceRoot>
           </configuration>
           <goals>
             <goal>run</goal>
           </goals>
         </execution>
       </executions>
     </plugin>
   </plugins>
 </build>

 <dependencies>
   <dependency>
     <groupId>com.google.protobuf</groupId>
     <artifactId>protobuf-java</artifactId>
     <version>2.0.3</version>
   </dependency>
 </dependencies>
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Absolutely riveting discussion, thanks for that link. –  Max A. Oct 16 '09 at 15:07
1  
I've found this answer satisfying, including for use with protobuf plugins which do not seem to be supported by the maven plugin. However, I'd recommend not using sourceRoot which is deprecated per maven.apache.org/plugins/maven-antrun-plugin/… and rely on build-helper-maven-plugin instead (see mojo.codehaus.org/build-helper-maven-plugin/usage.html). This was necessary to make my protocol project and others that depend on it behave correctly in m2eclipse. –  Thomas Dufour Sep 3 '10 at 10:29
    
@Thomas could you create a pastie.org with the pom needed for not using sourceRoot? –  TJR Nov 18 '10 at 15:54
1  
@TJ Sure. The relevant part looks like this pastie.org/1311036 –  Thomas Dufour Nov 19 '10 at 14:11
4  
You also probably want to add failonerror to the <exec> tag so that your build stops if there's an error in your proto file. I.e. <exec failonerror="true" executable="protoc">. –  George Hawkins Apr 29 '11 at 10:01

The accepted answer encouraged me to get the Google-provided plugin to work. I merged the branch mentioned in my question into a checkout of 2.2.0 source code, built and installed/deployed the plugin, and was able to use it in my project as follows:

  <build>
    <plugins>
      <plugin>
        <groupId>com.google.protobuf.tools</groupId>
        <artifactId>maven-protoc-plugin</artifactId>
        <version>0.0.1</version>
        <executions>
          <execution>
            <id>generate-sources</id>
            <goals>
              <goal>compile</goal>
            </goals>
            <phase>generate-sources</phase>
            <configuration>
              <protoSourceRoot>${basedir}/src/main/protobuf/</protoSourceRoot>
              <includes>
                <param>**/*.proto</param>
              </includes>
            </configuration>
          </execution>
        </executions>
        <configuration>
          <protocExecutable>/usr/local/bin/protoc</protocExecutable>
        </configuration>
      </plugin>
    </plugins>
  </build>

Note that I changed the plugin's version to 0.0.1 (no -SNAPSHOT) in order to make it go into my non-snapshot thirdparty Nexus repository. YMMV. The takeaway is that this plugin will be usable once it's no longer necessary to jump through hoops in order to get it going.

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Thanks for the feedback. –  Pascal Thivent Oct 16 '09 at 16:13
8  
Please make this plugin available in Maven Central. Also, is there a way to programmatically invoke protoc instead of looking for an executable? It is a pain to generate protoc on many platforms including Mac OS X. –  inder Apr 20 '11 at 17:28

The accepted solution does not scale for multiple proto files. I had to come up with my own:

<build>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <artifactId>maven-antrun-plugin</artifactId>
            <executions>
                <execution>
                    <id>compile-protoc</id>
                    <phase>generate-sources</phase>
                    <configuration>
                        <tasks>
                            <mkdir dir="${generated.sourceDirectory}" />
                            <path id="proto.path">
                                <fileset dir="src/main/proto">
                                    <include name="**/*.proto" />
                                </fileset>
                            </path>
                            <pathconvert pathsep=" " property="proto.files" refid="proto.path" />
                            <exec executable="protoc" failonerror="true">
                                <arg value="--java_out=${generated.sourceDirectory}" />
                                <arg value="-I${project.basedir}/src/main/proto" />
                                <arg line="${proto.files}" />
                            </exec>
                        </tasks>
                    </configuration>
                    <goals>
                        <goal>run</goal>
                    </goals>
                </execution>
            </executions>
        </plugin>
</build>
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how to specify the location of protoc.exe file. my build fails because it is unable to locate protoc. Is protoc supplied by the PB 2.4.1 dependency added to the pon.xml ? –  user01 Oct 2 '11 at 18:29
    
No, protoc is the protocol buffer compiler and needs to be installed to the machine the build is running on and included in that machine's path. Refer to code.google.com/apis/protocolbuffers/docs/proto.html#generating (specifically the section on generating your classes) for more information –  chrisbunney Dec 7 '11 at 12:30

There's also great plugin by Igor Petruk named protobuf-maven-plugin. It's in central repo now and plays nicely with eclipse (m2e-1.1 is recommended).

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The documentation for Igor's plugin is here. If you put your .proto files in src/main/protobuf, you'll get the output in target/generated-sources/protobuf. You'll still need protoc on your PATH for this to work. –  Brad Feb 27 '12 at 21:18

I just updated the maven plugin to work with 2.2.0 -- the updated pom are attached to the code review bug.

Here are the instructions to build the plugin yourself:

svn co http://protobuf.googlecode.com/svn/branches/maven-plugin/tools/maven-plugin
cd maven-plugin
wget -O pom.xml 'http://protobuf.googlecode.com/issues/attachment?aid=8860476605163151855&name=pom.xml'
mvn install

You can then use the maven config above.

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I just tried a less official but very recent (v 0.1.7) fork from https://github.com/dtrott/maven-protoc-plugin and it worked very well, courtesy of David Trott. I tested it with a couple of Maven modules one of which contained DTO-style messages and the other a service depending on them. I borrowed the plugin configuration MaxA posted on Oct 16 '09, I had protoc on my PATH and I added

<temporaryProtoFileDirectory>${basedir}/target/temp</temporaryProtoFileDirectory>

right after

<protocExecutable>protoc</protocExecutable>.

What is really nice is that all I had to do is to declare a normal dependency from the service module on the DTO module. The plugin was able to resolve proto files dependencies by finding the proto files packaged with the DTO module, extracting them to a temporary directory and using while generating code for the service. And it was smart enough not to package a second copy of the generated DTO classes with the service module.

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I forked of the plugin from David Trott and have it compiling multiple languages which makes it a lot more useful. See the github project here and a tutorial on integrating it with a maven build here.

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I think that using antrun to invoke non-Maven steps is the generally accepted solution.

You could also try the maven-exec-plugin.

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I have two problems with using antrun: (1) Its stated purpose is to ease migration from or integration with Ant. I'm attempting to achieve neither. Thus using it in this case would almost seem like misuse. (2) I'm really just trying to spawn an external OS process. Pulling in all of Ant just for that is, IMHO, overkill. maven-exec-plugin sounds like a leaner and more appropriate choice in this case. –  Max A. Oct 16 '09 at 14:58
    
I agree it's overkill but at times it can offer an easy way to do un-Maven things. –  matt b Oct 16 '09 at 15:49
    
The funny part is that the Google folks use Maven to build the Java piece of protobuf, so there's absolutely nothing "un-Maven" about wanting to use a Maven plugin to compile my .proto sources. I'm sure this process will become easier once they have gotten their act together. All that remains really is to get this plugin into either Google's repository or central. –  Max A. Oct 16 '09 at 15:58

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