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I'm making something in Flash that simulates X number of spins in roulette, takes each value, determines its colour and then pushes "strings" of colours into an array every time the colour changes (so for instance if it goes R,R,R,B when it hits black, it pushes '3' into an array and starts counting again). What I'm trying to determine is over a set number of spins (say for instance, 9 spins) if it can find any particular pattern forming throughout the array.

I do this because a peculiar thing occurred when I was testing between 2 different cases. One case was if(arr[i] > 2 && arr[i+1] < 7), which is pretty much if any sequence of one colour that lasts longer than 2 spins is succeeded by a sequence of less than 7: (~RRRB,~RRRBB,~RRRBBB,~RRRBBBB,~RRRBBBBB~,RRRBBBBBB)

The other case is any sequence of alternating colours that gets broken before it hits an 8 streak: (RBRR, RBRBB,RBRBRR,RBRBRBB,RBRBRBRR,RBRBRBRBB)

On average, the second scenario occurs 20% more often than the first...which, since both scenarios have the same number of cases with each case having the same number of spins in them, shouldn't happen statistically, even account for the 0, 20% is huge... I'll post the code to both below to make sure it's correct, but it just boggles my mind about the difference...anyway I digress.

Basically I'm just trying to figure out if any other particular patterns of 9 sequential numbers (based on their colour, not value) tend to appear more often. I really have no idea how other way to go about it than to either put it in a massive nested for loop 9 deep then check each outcome in a switch (which, would be absolutely HUGE, 2^9 huge...).

for(
    for(
        for(
            for(
                for(
                    for(
                        for(
                            for(
                                for(
                                    switch(){ //512 cases

Now I know it's flash, and actionscript is probably one of the worst to do this in but I'm creating a small application and I haven't learnt C or its variants well enough to do it in anything else. All I really need is a pointer to any particular efficient shortcuts I could use. Any tips would be greatly appreciated.

Code for scenarios:

function findSequence():void
{
    for (var i = 0; i< avgNumCl.length; i++)
    {
        if (avgNumCl[i] > 2 && avgNumCl[i + 1] < 7)
        {
            sequenceArr[0]++;
        }
        if (avgNumCl[i] == 1 && avgNumCl[i+1] == 1 &&
           avgNumCl[i+2] == 1 && avgNumCl[i+3] == 1 &&
           avgNumCl[i+4] == 1 && avgNumCl[i+5] == 1 &&
           avgNumCl[i+6] == 1 && avgNumCl[i+7]>1)
        {
            sequenceArr[1]++;
        }
        else if (avgNumCl[i] == 1 && avgNumCl[i+1] == 1 &&
           avgNumCl[i+2] == 1 && avgNumCl[i+3] == 1 &&
           avgNumCl[i+4] == 1 && avgNumCl[i+5] == 1 &&
           avgNumCl[i+6]>1)
        {
            sequenceArr[1]++;
        }
        else if (avgNumCl[i] == 1 && avgNumCl[i+1] == 1 &&
           avgNumCl[i+2] == 1 && avgNumCl[i+3] == 1 &&
           avgNumCl[i+4] == 1 && avgNumCl[i+5]>1)
        {
            sequenceArr[1]++;
        }
        else if (avgNumCl[i] == 1 && avgNumCl[i+1] == 1 &&
           avgNumCl[i+2] == 1 && avgNumCl[i+3] == 1 &&
           avgNumCl[i+4]>1)
        {
            sequenceArr[1]++;
        }
        else if (avgNumCl[i] == 1 && avgNumCl[i+1] == 1 &&
           avgNumCl[i+2] == 1 && avgNumCl[i+3]>1)
        {
            sequenceArr[1]++;
        }
        else if (avgNumCl[i] == 1 && avgNumCl[i+1] == 1 &&
           avgNumCl[i+2]>1)
        {
            sequenceArr[1]++;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I figure because I'm restricting pattern length to 9 units it might not be as computationally intensive. (is that a word?) –  James McGrath Apr 3 '13 at 10:26
    
Hmm, testing internal Flash Math.random() distribution? :) Well, you can search for a consecutive number of 1's in your array, if it's large then there you are, and you can also search for large (3+) consecutive values. I wonder what you mean about checking patterns - you have a "random" string of 9 R's and B's, and want to know which number of those copmlies with which condition? This one is easy to test, and you need only 1 "for" cycle, just use an uint and treat its bits as 1 for red and 0 for black, then do whatever checks you need against that number. –  Vesper Apr 3 '13 at 12:11
    
It's the checks themselves that I'm trying to find out if they're easier to accomplish. Since basically I'm trying to figure out if there are any other patterns of 9 that emerge more likely than strings of the same colour. I'm trying to test every possible combination (512) –  James McGrath Apr 3 '13 at 15:17
    
Okay, still, represent that string of 9 as an uint, when processing another R or B you shift the number left, trim it by &511 and add 1 if red, and then add to counters array. This will yield you an array of size 512 that will contain all data about appearances of all 9-long patterns of red and black, and that one is already a statistic you seek. –  Vesper Apr 3 '13 at 20:37
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