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This is the dictionary

cars = {'A':{'speed':70,
        'color':2},
        'B':{'speed':60,
        'color':3}}

Using this for loop

for keys,values in cars.items():
    print(keys)
    print(values)

It prints the following:

B
{'color': 3, 'speed': 60}
A
{'color': 2, 'speed': 70}

But I want the program to print it like this:

B
color : 3
speed : 60
A
color : 2
speed : 70

I just started learning dictionaries so I'm not sure how to do this.

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5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted
for x in cars:
    print (x)
    for y in cars[x]:
        print (y,':',cars[x][y])

output:

A
color : 2
speed : 70
B
color : 3
speed : 60
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This is works but ' : ' in print should be ':' to avoid extra spacing in the output. –  Jett Apr 3 '13 at 11:25
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You have a nested structure, so you need to format the nested dictionary too:

for key, car in cars.items():
    print(key)
    for attribute, value in car.items():
        print('{} : {}'.format(attribute, value))

This prints:

A
color : 2
speed : 70
B
color : 3
speed : 60
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A more generalized solution that handles arbitrarily-deeply nested dicts and lists would be:

def dumpclean(obj):
    if type(obj) == dict:
        for k, v in obj.items():
            if hasattr(v, '__iter__'):
                print k
                dumpclean(v)
            else:
                print '%s : %s' % (k, v)
    elif type(obj) == list:
        for v in obj:
            if hasattr(v, '__iter__'):
                dumpclean(v)
            else:
                print v
    else:
        print obj

This produces the output:

A
color : 2
speed : 70
B
color : 3
speed : 60

I ran into a similar need and developed a more robust function as an exercise for myself. I'm including it here in case it can be of value to another. In running nosetest, I also found it helpful to be able to specify the output stream in the call so that sys.stderr could be used instead.

import sys

def dump(obj, nested_level=0, output=sys.stdout):
    spacing = '   '
    if type(obj) == dict:
        print >> output, '%s{' % ((nested_level) * spacing)
        for k, v in obj.items():
            if hasattr(v, '__iter__'):
                print >> output, '%s%s:' % ((nested_level + 1) * spacing, k)
                dump(v, nested_level + 1, output)
            else:
                print >> output, '%s%s: %s' % ((nested_level + 1) * spacing, k, v)
        print >> output, '%s}' % (nested_level * spacing)
    elif type(obj) == list:
        print >> output, '%s[' % ((nested_level) * spacing)
        for v in obj:
            if hasattr(v, '__iter__'):
                dump(v, nested_level + 1, output)
            else:
                print >> output, '%s%s' % ((nested_level + 1) * spacing, v)
        print >> output, '%s]' % ((nested_level) * spacing)
    else:
        print >> output, '%s%s' % (nested_level * spacing, obj)

Using this function, the OP's output looks like this:

{
   A:
   {
      color: 2
      speed: 70
   }
   B:
   {
      color: 3
      speed: 60
   }
}

which I personally found to be more useful and descriptive.

Given the slightly less-trivial example of:

{"test": [{1:3}], "test2":[(1,2),(3,4)],"test3": {(1,2):['abc', 'def', 'ghi'],(4,5):'def'}}

The OP's requested solution yields this:

test
1 : 3
test3
(1, 2)
abc
def
ghi
(4, 5) : def
test2
(1, 2)
(3, 4)

whereas the 'enhanced' version yields this:

{
   test:
   [
      {
         1: 3
      }
   ]
   test3:
   {
      (1, 2):
      [
         abc
         def
         ghi
      ]
      (4, 5): def
   }
   test2:
   [
      (1, 2)
      (3, 4)
   ]
}

I hope this provides some value to the next person looking for this type of functionality.

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1  
And if the format is not overly strict, one could also use 'print json.dumps(obj, indent=3)'. That gives a reasonable representation of most structures, though it does choke (in my environment) on my less-trivial example due to the use of a tuple as a key... –  MrWonderful Jan 10 at 16:17
    
Why not just use pprint.pprint() here then? –  Martijn Pieters Jul 3 at 11:09
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for car,info in cars.items():
    print(car)
    for key,value in info.items():
        print(key, ":", value)
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This will work if you know the tree only has two levels:

for k1 in cars:
    print(k1)
    d = cars[k1]
    for k2 in d
        print(k2, ':', d[k2])
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