Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am sending some simple user details to a Nancy module. I am taking advantage of Nancy's model binding feature to harvest the user details from the request and pass them to my UserService.Add(...) method, like this:

Nancy Module

Post["/add"] = parameters =>
{
    var user = this.Bind<UserDetails>();
    UserService.Add(user);
    return HttpStatusCode.OK;
};

User Details Class

public class UserDetails
{
    public string UserName { get; set; }
    public string Password { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
}

User Service

public static void Add(UserDetails user)
{
    //Add the user     
}

This works and makes for terse syntax in the Nancy Module. However it means that I am forced to create a data-transfer (DTO) class simply to harvest the Request payload.

Is it possible to avoid this intermediary class altogether? Instead of binding a class to the payload, would it be possible to bind the Method parameters instead?

This would give code that might look something like this:

Nancy Module

Post["/add"] = parameters =>
{
    this.BindAndCall<UserService>("Add");
    return HttpStatusCode.OK;
};

User Service

public static void Add(string  firstName, string  lastName, string email, string userName, string password)
{
    //Add the user     
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You can always create some extension methods or custom binder, but then you are coupling the internal implementation of your service to the exact naming of the parameters for the payload, which is not good, as later when your service changes, you need to change the payload or jump trough hoops. There's nothing wrong with the DTO, it costs nothing to create.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree about the coupling especially if the API was public. However, do you think there is a case where the service is private? If I refactor my service then I refactor the payload generation as well. FWIW, I disagree that DTOs are effectively cost-free. I think that ceremony always costs in the long run and DTOs feel like to ceremony to me. Thanks for your input. –  biofractal Apr 24 '13 at 13:54
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The ParameterBag - A Partial Solution to DTO Proliferation

To my mind, DTOs are pain as they tend to proliferate into a shadow-domain. This creates headaches when you decide to reorganise your service layer.

So why not just use dynamic types and forget all about DTOs and strongly-typed route parameters? Well dynamic values are very convenient but they have their own problems, chiefly that you cannot pass them to extension methods. So it is just easier to have the route parameters correctly presented, hence model binding, hence DTOs and hence spaghetti and silly hats.

So here is a partial solution relies on Nancy's Model Binding. It significantly reduces route-level ceremony and helps contain that annoying DTO proliferation.

Nancy Base Module

public class _BaseModule : NancyModule
{
    public class ParameterBag
    {
        // All the params used across all routes, GET and POST
        public string UserName { get { return this.Value; } }
        public string UserIds { get; set; }
        public string UserId { get; set; }
        public string Value { get; set; }
        public int Skip { get; set; }
        public int Take { get; set; }
    }

    public ParameterBag Params;

    public _BaseModule(): this(""){}
    public _BaseModule(string modulePath): base(modulePath)
    {
        Before += ctx =>
        {
            this.Params = this.Bind<ParameterBag>();
            return null;
        };
    }
}

The ParameterBag class contains all the parameters that I am interested in binding across all routes. Since Nancy will only populate the properties if it finds a matching field in the payload, you can just add as many properties to this class as you like without caring if they will be used by a given route or not.

Note how the Binding takes place in the Before hook. This means that every route (that derives from the _BaseModule) will automatically bind any matching parameter values to the universal ParameterBag class properties. No specific route-level intervention required.

The effect of this is to provide the route handlers with a strongly typed parameter values that can be just used.

Nancy Module

public class UserModule : _BaseModule
{
    public UserModule()
    {
        // handlers go here
    }
}

Route Handler Example

Get["/user/{userid}/username/available"] = _ =>
{
    return Response.AsJson(new 
        { 
            // the username is a hidden value
            // the userid comes from the url
            value = Params.UserName,
            valid = UserService.UserNameAvailable(Params.UserName, Params.UserId)
        }
    );
};

Example Usage

The example below relies on the jqBootstrapValidation. It shows how the Binding trick works for parameter data supplied on the URL and provided as part of an ajax payload (see value attribute).

<input 
    type="text" 
    id="username" 
    name="username" 
    placeholder="User Name" 
    data-validation-ajax-ajax="/user/@user.id/username/available" 
    data-validation-ajax-message="This name has already been taken" 
    value="@user.UserName" 
    required>
share|improve this answer
    
Besides the naming, I do not see how this is different than DTO. Still there is a class to which all the params are bound. Unless your definition for DTO is shared class between the the consumer and the service. –  Sunny Milenov Apr 26 '13 at 17:55
1  
Its different only in so far as it reduces the amount of ceremony - and that is a good difference imo. Instead of creating a DTO shadow-domain, where many routes have their own named DTO whose only job is to act as a binding source for the route parameters, I have, in effect, created a catch-all ParameterBag that can just be used without consulting the high priests. As you point out, theoretically this is just a DTO but in practice I find that having a universal DTO significantly reduces the coding overhead by making the binding of all route parameters automatic and non-route-specific. –  biofractal Apr 30 '13 at 16:08
    
Agree, but ... then why just not use the dynamics nancy already uses :) –  Sunny Milenov May 1 '13 at 13:02
1  
Because dynamic param values cannot be passed to Extension Methods. They also cause problems as you pass them into normal methods because they are not cast to the method argument type but retain the dynamic-ness until they die. This leads to confusing bugs deep in the meatballs of my finest spaghetti code - you can eyeball a suspect method argument type using the method signature and be reassured but the actual argument type is still secretly dynamic at runtime. –  biofractal May 1 '13 at 13:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.