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I would like to ask on how I can use both functions once the page loads

jQuery(document).ready(function($)
{
    $('#list').tableScroll({height:500});

});

and

jQuery(document).ready(function($)
{
    $('#list').tableSorter();

});
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1  
It's not the shortest way to write it, but your two separate pieces of code would work if you put them both in the page. –  Anthony Grist Apr 3 '13 at 12:03

9 Answers 9

up vote 7 down vote accepted
jQuery(document).ready(function($) {
    $('#list').tableSorter().tableScroll({height:500});
});
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Much better than my answer :) –  Mark Withers Apr 3 '13 at 12:02

jQuery supports method chaining.

jQuery(document).ready(function($) {
    $('#list')
        .tableScroll({height:500})
        .tableSorter();    
});
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You're right.. this is true only if the plugins you are using supports chainability –  Matei Mihai Apr 3 '13 at 12:04
jQuery(document).ready(function($)
{
    $('#list').tableScroll({height:500});
    $('#list').tableSorter();
});
share|improve this answer
    
For readability, your approach might be preferred by some. –  DOK Apr 3 '13 at 12:09

Just put both under one DOM ready handler and use chaining:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $("#list").tableScroll({ height: 500 }).tableSorter();
});
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$(document).ready(function() {
    $("#list").tableScroll({ height: 500 }).tableSorter();
});
share|improve this answer

I guess its fine to have more than one

jQuery(document).ready(function($) { .... }

both will be called on page on load body :). irrespective of no of call`s made, all will be called on page load only.

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Simple, use

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
    $('#list').tableScroll({height:500}).tableSorter();
});
share|improve this answer

There is a shorter version of jQuery(document).ready(function()) that you could use that would have the same result:

 $(function() {
   // code to execute when the DOM is ready
 });

For this situation, using the elegant chaining:

$(function() {
    $('#list').tableSorter().tableScroll({height:500});
 });

For a discussion of the difference between these two approaches, see this very helpful question.

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but maybe toink uses other libraries so that $ has to be escaped? –  elektronikLexikon Apr 3 '13 at 12:08
    
Well, @elektronikLexikon, there is always the possibility of collisions when multiple libraries are used, but that is not the question here. –  DOK Apr 3 '13 at 12:16
    
it could be the reason why he used jQuery(document).ready(function($) in his question, though. –  elektronikLexikon Apr 3 '13 at 12:33

Here's how I would do it:

// Create an immediately-invoked function expression
(function ($) {

    // Enable strict mode
    "use strict";

    // Cache the selector so the script
    // only searches the DOM once
    var myList = $('#list'); 

    // Chain the methods together
    myList.tableScroll({height:500}).tableSorter();

}(jQuery));

Writing your jQuery in an IIFE like this means you can run the code alongside other libraries that also use $, and you won’t get conflicts.

Be sure to include this JavaScript at the end of your document, just before the closing </body> tag.

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