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I'm using Scala 2.10.1 and I'm trying the define a method which will retrieve all the vals (including the inherited ones) from an object.

I have the following:

import scala.reflect.runtime.{universe => ru}

object Reflection {

  val mirror = ru.runtimeMirror(this.getClass.getClassLoader)

  def findVals(x: Any): Iterable[String] = {
    val theType = mirror.classSymbol(x.getClass).toType
    theType.members.collect({case x if x.isTerm => x.asTerm}).filter(_.isVal).map(_.name.toString)
  }

}

I am testing on these two classes:

class Base {
  val x = 10
}

class Child extends Base {
  val y = 20
}

When calling the following code:

val x = new Child
val vs = Reflection.findVals(x)
println(vs)

The result is List(y)

For some reason, the isVal method returns false for the term corresponding to the x field from the Base class.

Can someone tell me what's the problem here? Am I doing something wrong?

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Please see stackoverflow.com/questions/15784320/… –  Steve Waldman Apr 3 '13 at 13:58
    
That really doesn't answer my question –  Marius Danila Apr 3 '13 at 14:49
    
Oh, sorry. I misread the problem. –  Steve Waldman Apr 3 '13 at 15:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Per Why don't Scala case class fields reflect as public? you should use isAccessor instead of isVal.

I'm actually using isGetter and setter to properly filter vars per your comment:

  def findVals(x: Any): Iterable[String] = {
    val theType = mirror.classSymbol(x.getClass).toType
    val xtm = theType.members.collect({case x if x.isTerm => x.asTerm})
    xtm.filter(m => m.isGetter && !xtm.exists(m.setter == _)).map(_.name.toString)
  }

Results:

scala> class Base {
     | var x = 10
     | val xx = 2
     | }
defined class Base

scala> class Child extends Base {
     | val y = 3
     | }
defined class Child

scala> val x = new Child
x: Child = Child@1c0026e

scala> val vs = Reflection.findVals(x)
vs: Iterable[String] = List(y, xx)

scala> println(vs)
List(y, xx)
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that this will also return vars. For instance, if x in Base becomes a var, it will also get returned, together with x_$eq. –  Marius Danila Apr 3 '13 at 15:01
    
updated - a bit of a hack but it works. –  sourcedelica Apr 3 '13 at 17:49
    
made less of a hack. –  sourcedelica Apr 3 '13 at 18:10
    
Yes, this will do, thank you. It does seem strange, though, that isVal doesn't return true for inherited members. It looks like a bug –  Marius Danila Apr 3 '13 at 18:27

Using SMirror:

scala> implicit val mirror = scala.reflect.runtime.currentMirror
mirror: reflect.runtime.universe.Mirror = JavaMirror with scala.tool…

scala> import net.fwbrasil.smirror._
import net.fwbrasil.smirror._

scala> class Base {
  val x = 10
}   
defined class Base

scala> class Child extends Base {
  val y = 20
}   
defined class Child

scala> val x = new Child
x: Child = Child@448593d0

scala> x.reflect.vals
res5: List[net.fwbrasil.smirror.SInstanceVal[Child]] = List(val x: scala.Int (bound to Child@448593d0), val y: scala.Int (bound to Child@448593d0))

scala> x.reflect.vals.head.get
res7: Any = 10
share|improve this answer

So, this is terribly inelegant, but it seems to work:

import scala.reflect.runtime.{universe => ru}

object Reflection {

  val mirror = ru.runtimeMirror(this.getClass.getClassLoader)

  val ObjectClass = classOf[java.lang.Object];

  def findVals(x: Any) : Iterable[String] = findVals( x.getClass, List.empty );

  def findVals(clz: Class[_], accum : Iterable[String]): Iterable[String] = {

    clz match {
      case  ObjectClass => accum;
      case _ => {
        val theType = mirror.classSymbol(clz).toType
        val newVals = theType.members.collect({case x if x.isTerm => x.asTerm}).filter(_.isVal).map(_.name.toString)
        findVals( clz.getSuperclass, accum ++ newVals )
      }
    }
  }

}

Then...

scala> class Base {
     |   val x = 10
     |   var z = 20
     | }
defined class Base

scala> class Child extends Base {
     | val y = 20
     | var a = 9
     | }
defined class Child

scala> val x = new Child
x: Child = Child@3093266d

scala> val vs = Reflection.findVals(x)
vs: Iterable[String] = List("y ", "x ")

scala> println(vs)
List(y , x )

It seems that, at least for now, Scala reflection looks at the Java field to determine the presence of a val, so I guess you just have to climb the class hierarchy... I'm guessing it looks for the presence of a setter to distinguish val from var. Again, not so lovely, but functional.

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