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I tried without any result. My code looks like this:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>

#define R() ( rand() )
#define H(a,b) ( a ## b )
#define S(a) ( # a )
#define CAT() H(S(distinct_name_), R())


int main(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::cout << CAT() << std::endl; 
    std::cout << CAT() << std::endl;
    std::cout << CAT() << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

I would like to get a result like this:

distinct_name_12233
distinct_name_147
distinct_name_435

as a result of concatenating 
distinct_name_ (##) rand()

Right now I am getting an error: term does not evaluate to a function taking 1 arguments. Is this achievable ??

EDIT: I finally succeeded after couple of hours. The preprocessor still does strange things I cannot understand completely. Here it goes:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>

class profiler 
{
public:
    void show() 	
    {
    	std::cout << "distinct_instance" << std::endl; 		
    }
};

#define XX __LINE__
#define H(a,b) ( a ## b )
#define CAT(r) H(distinct_name_, r)
#define GET_DISTINCT() CAT(XX)
#define PROFILE() \
    profiler GET_DISTINCT() ;\
    GET_DISTINCT().show() ; \


int main(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{

    PROFILE()
    PROFILE()
    return 0;
}

And the output is:

distinct_instance
distinct_instance

Thanks @Kinopiko for __LINE__ hint. :)

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1  
You can always look at the output of the C preprocessor using cpp filename.cpp if you need to debug it. –  user181548 Oct 16 '09 at 15:20
    
In addition, S(distinct_name_) would give you ("distinct_name_"), and concatenating with R() would give you even when rand() would yield a random number ("distinct_name_")(1233) . You don't want the # a step and the parentheses. The ## operator works with raw tokens, not somehow with strings. I'm not even sure whether you wouldn't get even an error message when trying to concatenate ) and (, both of which are punctuators. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 16 '09 at 15:44
    
I.e they split tokens, but ## would try to concatenate them into one token, which can only result in an error. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 16 '09 at 15:47
    
It shouldn't produce any different output, but I'd prefer cc -E in case the particular compiler has its own special settings or macros. –  ephemient Oct 16 '09 at 15:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I see that a lot of people have already correctly answered this question, but as an alternative suggestion, if your preprocessor implements __TIME__ or __LINE__ you could get a result quite like what you want, with a line number or time concatenated, rather than a random number.

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No, you can't do that. Macros are a compile-time thing and functions are called only at run time, so there's no way you could get a random number from rand() into your macro expansion.

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+1 Very much this. –  Stephen Canon Oct 16 '09 at 15:18

What you are actually getting is...

std::cout << distinct_name_rand() << std::endl;

distinct_name_rand() isn't a function, so it fails with a compile error.

Macros don't execute functions during compile time.

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You must pass run-time computed value to the macro since macro are evaluated at compile-time. Try:

#define H(a,b) ( a ## b )
#define S(a) ( # a )
#define CAT(r) H(S(distinct_name_), r)

std::cout << CAT(rand()) << std::endl;
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