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I've been trying to load a 3d model format into C++, but I'm having a problem with it. Everything goes okay except for the indicies array of shorts... When I try and load one model, the first 2 spaces in the array are incorret... if I load a second model; more of the shorts are wrong further into the model data...

Here is my header file:

#ifndef MODELDATA_H
#define MODELDATA_H

#include <GL/glu.h>
#include <string>

using namespace std;


class modelData
{
    public:
    modelData();
    virtual ~modelData();

    short m_vert_count;
    short m_ind_count;
    short m_tid;
    GLfloat *m_verts;
    GLfloat *m_tex;
    GLint *m_ind;

    void loadModel(string input);
    void draw();

    protected:
    private:
};

#endif // MODELDATA_H

And here is my cpp file:

#include "modelData.h"
#include <GL/glu.h>
#include <fstream>
#include <string.h>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

modelData::modelData()
{
    //ctor
    m_verts = NULL;
    m_tex = NULL;
    m_ind = NULL;
    m_ind_count = 0;
    m_vert_count = 0;
}

modelData::~modelData()
{
    //dtor
    delete[] m_verts;
    delete[] m_tex;
    delete[] m_ind;
    m_ind_count = 0;
    m_vert_count = 0;
}

void modelData::loadModel(string input)
{
    short temp;
    char *newInput = new char[input.size()+1];
    newInput[input.size()]=0;
    memcpy(newInput,input.c_str(),input.size());
    ifstream a_file( newInput,  ios::binary | ios::in );
    delete newInput;

    a_file.seekg( 0, ios::beg );
    if ( ! a_file.read( reinterpret_cast<char*>( & m_vert_count ), sizeof( short ) ) )
    {
        cout << "Error reading from file: can't attain vertex buffer size" << endl;
        return;
    }

    if ( ! a_file.read( reinterpret_cast<char*>( & m_ind_count ), sizeof( short ) ) )
    {
        cout << "Error reading from file: can't attain index buffer size" << endl;
        return;
    }

    m_verts = new GLfloat[m_vert_count];
    m_ind = new GLint[m_ind_count];
    m_tex = new GLfloat[m_vert_count];

    for (int i = 0; i < m_vert_count; i++)
    {
        if ( ! a_file.read( reinterpret_cast<char*>( & m_verts[i] ), sizeof( float ) ) )
        {
            cout << "Error reading from file: can't attain vertex buffer" << endl;
            return;
        }
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < ((m_vert_count)/3)*2; i++)
    {
        if ( ! a_file.read( reinterpret_cast<char*>( & m_tex[i] ), sizeof( float ) ) )
        {
            cout << "Error reading from file: can't attain texcoord buffer" << endl;
            return;
        }
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < m_ind_count; i++)
    {
        if ( ! a_file.read( reinterpret_cast<char*>( & m_ind[i] ), sizeof( short ) ) )
        {
            cout << "Error reading from file: can't attain index buffer" << endl;
            return;
        }
    }


    cout << m_vert_count << "   " << m_ind_count << endl;
    cout << "Model successfully loaded from " << input << "  ...Jolly good." << endl;

}

void modelData::draw()
{
    glEnableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
    glVertexPointer(3,GL_FLOAT,0,m_verts);
    glEnableClientState(GL_TEXTURE_COORD_ARRAY);
    glTexCoordPointer(2,GL_FLOAT,0,m_tex);
    glDrawElements(GL_TRIANGLES,m_ind_count,GL_UNSIGNED_INT,m_ind);
    glDisableClientState(GL_TEXTURE_COORD_ARRAY);
    glDisableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);

}

I hope the code isn't too long or too messy, I just really don't know what's happening... as far as I can tell; m_verts[] and m_tex[] look like they get filled fine, but m_ind[] keeps having wrong numbers pop up every so often through the array... Am I allocating the Array incorrectly? Am I not cleaning up something I should of?

Oh, and I don't think this is causing the problem, but you'll notice I haven't added anything to hadle big or little endian conversion... this is because I'm using an intel machine which seems to always assume little endian and my android game engine uses little endian... so I don't think that's the problem...

Any help or suggestions would be great. Thanks for reading.

share|improve this question
    
is GLint equal size as short? why use sizeof( short ) why not sizeof( GLint)? –  user995502 Apr 3 '13 at 13:25
    
This doesn't answer your question, but in loadModel, the whole newInput thing should be replaced with ifstream a_file( input.c_str(), ios::binary | ios::in ); (or, in C++11, ifstream a_file( input, ios::binary | ios::in );). –  Robᵩ Apr 3 '13 at 13:25
1  
Please free yourself (and us) from manual memory management and use std::vector or some better fit from the standard library, and obey the rule of three/five (_you have many potential memory leaks and double deletions there). Also, free yourself (and us) from the torments of global using directives in header files. I.e., grab a good C++ book that teaches idiomatic C++, before trying to do more advanced stuff. –  phresnel Apr 3 '13 at 13:27
    
@stardust_ Actually the format uses shorts, but you and Angew's comments helped because that turned out to be the problem... I just ended up casting the short to a GLint and now the code runs fine. –  Kalisme Apr 3 '13 at 14:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If I can see right, m_ind is typed as an array of GLints, but you're reading into it as if it was an array of shorts. On most platforms, this means the upper two bytes of the value are pretty much random.

If your data stream actually contains shorts, this would be the safe way to read them:

for (int i = 0; i < m_ind_count; i++)
{
    short val;
    if ( ! a_file.read( reinterpret_cast<char*>( & val ), sizeof( short ) ) )
    {
        cout << "Error reading from file: can't attain index buffer" << endl;
        return;
    }
    m_ind[i] = val;
}

A few unrelated notes:

o This:

char *newInput = new char[input.size()+1];
newInput[input.size()]=0;
memcpy(newInput,input.c_str(),input.size());
ifstream a_file( newInput,  ios::binary | ios::in );
delete newInput;

is just a really complicated way of saying this:

ifstream a_file(input.c_str(), ios::binary | ios::in);

o I strongly suggest using std::vector instead of manually dynamically allocating and deallocating your arrays.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for replying so quickly. The second point about the string to char conversion was really helpful. Unfortunately the binary being read in to fill m_ind is actually made up of shorts... could the problem be using ifstream to copy a short into a GLint? For some weird reason most of the shorts copy over fine, but some turn out as really big numbers like "131258". –  Kalisme Apr 3 '13 at 13:40
    
@Kalisme I've edited the answer. –  Angew Apr 3 '13 at 13:55
    
Thank you very much. I think I got confused from using Java for the last year... I think the Java version I wrote was automatically casting the shorts to Ints... And thanks for the std::vector suggestion, I'll probably use it instead of dynamic arrays in the future. –  Kalisme Apr 4 '13 at 6:43

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