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In an effort to standardize my code and make it more portable, I replaced

#ifdef __GNUC__
typedef __attribute__((aligned(16))) float aligned_block[4];
#else
typedef __declspec(align(16)) float aligned_block[4];
#endif

with

typedef float alignas(16) aligned_block[4];

in C++11. However, gnu (4.8) doesn't like that but complains

test.cc:3:9: warning: attribute ignored [-Wattributes]
  typedef float alignas(16) aligned_block[4];
                ^
test.cc:3:9: note: an attribute that appertains to a type-specifier is ignored

whereas clang 3.2 creates no warning (even with -Weverything -Wno-c++98-compat -pedantic). So I wonder whether my code above is correct and, more generally, where alignas() can and cannot be placed.

-------------edit--------------

The relevant article from the standard is 7.6.2, in particular 7.6.2.1

An alignment-specifier may be applied to a variable or to a class data member, but it shall not be applied to a bit-field, a function parameter, the formal parameter of a catch clause (15.3), or a variable declared with the register storage class specifier. An alignment-specifier may also be applied to the declaration of a class or enumeration type. An alignment-specifier with an ellipsis is a pack expansion (14.5.3).

as already dug out by Red XIII. However, I'm not expert enough to know what this means for my test above.

If the fact that clang accepts my attribute means anything, it's perhaps worth mentioning that when trying to use a using directive instead of a typedef, clang also complains. Also, contrary to a statement in an earlier version of this question, gcc does not only warn, but indeed ignores my wish for alignment.

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Are you using gcc -std=c++11 option? –  shayief Apr 3 '13 at 13:43
3  
@SergIef g++ -std=c++11 -Wextra -Wall -pedantic –  Walter Apr 3 '13 at 13:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted
+50

I think you just placed the alignas in the wrong position. If you move it directly after the identifier, both GCC and Clang are happy and apply the alignment:

typedef float aligned_block alignas(16) [4];
typedef float aligned_block [4] alignas(16);

this is also true if you use using, where the difference also becomes more apparent. Here are two versions that are not accepted by GCC (warning, alignment ignored):

using aligned_block = float alignas(16)[4];
using aligned_block = float[4] alignas(16);

and here's the accepted one:

using aligned_block alignas(16) = float[4];

I think that GCC applies

7.1.3 The typedef specifier [dcl.typedef]

2 A typedef-name can also be introduced by an alias-declaration. The identifier following the using keyword becomes a typedef-name and the optional attribute-specifier-seq following the identifier appertains to that typedef-name. It has the same semantics as if it were introduced by the `typedef specifier. [...]

(emphasis mine)

The above is quite clear for using, the rules for typedef are spread through several paragraphs, including at the end of §8.3/1, where you find:

8.3 Meaning of declarators

1 [...] The optional attribute-specifier-seq following a declarator-id appertains to the entity that is declared.

(again, emphasis mine)

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1  
thanks. good answer. enjoy your bounty ;-) –  Walter Apr 10 '13 at 14:46
    
For both typedefs and "accepted" using clang complains: error: 'alignas' attribute only applies to variables, data members and tag types –  jjrv Aug 3 at 13:28

Draft C++11 standard http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2012/n3337.pdf says about it (Alignment-specifier is of the form alignas ( assignment-expression )):

7.6.2 Alignment specifier [dcl.align]

1 An alignment-specifier may be applied to a variable or to a class data member, but it shall not be applied to a bit-field, a function parameter, the formal parameter of a catch clause (15.3), or a variable declared with the register storage class specifier. An alignment-specifier may also be applied to the declaration of a class or enumeration type. An alignment-specifier with an ellipsis is a pack expansion.

I found this original proposal http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2005/n1877.pdf , it says:

The alignment-specifier does not become part of the type, but it is possible to create a class type with aligned member variable(s).

with this example:

// Wrong attempt: Listing 6)
typedef double align_by<0x10000> hwDoubleVector; // Error!
Void clear(hwDoubleVector &toClear, unsigned size);

Looks like it's illegal to use it with typedef.

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1  
+1 for the effort, but this is not the answer I'm looking for. The text of the original proposal would clearly not allow my construction. But it's from 2005 and it's not the standard. –  Walter Apr 3 '13 at 17:37
    
Just in case, here is where proposal referenced stroustrup.com/C++11FAQ.html#align –  shayief Apr 3 '13 at 17:54

Try:

typedef float alignas(16) aligned_block[4];
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I did (of course): same –  Walter Apr 3 '13 at 17:35
    
g++ 4.8 compiles this, but warns that the alignment will be ignored: "an attribute that appertains to a type-specifier is ignored". –  Piotr99 Apr 3 '13 at 17:50
    
@Piotr99 Did you read my question? or did you cut & paste & run? If you had read my question, you would also have found out that gcc first warns that it ignores the attribute, but then actually implements it! –  Walter Apr 3 '13 at 18:06
    
@Walter oops... yes, you're right! Sorry, I missed that. Should get a good sleep now before writing more stupid comments ;) –  Piotr99 Apr 3 '13 at 19:37

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