Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I was trying to figure out how Ruby handles local variables that have the same names as the methods in self class, and found a behavior that I do not understand:

class A
  def val
    10
  end

  def test
    val = val
  end
end

p A.new.test

this code prints nil. why?!

share|improve this question
    
The method val is a red herring. You're never actually calling it. – Jörg W Mittag Apr 4 '13 at 1:25
    
Similar for the method and a variable inside it with the same name: stackoverflow.com/questions/8174019/…, variable outside: stackoverflow.com/questions/3741582/… – Ciro Santilli 六四事件 法轮功 包卓轩 Oct 12 '14 at 18:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think that the local variable is declared as soon as it's enunciated. In ruby the lookup is first to look for a local variable, if it exists it's used, and if not it looks for a method. This would mean that val = val declares the first val as local and the left-hand val then matches it (not sure about it I should check the ruby under microscope to be sure)

If you try

class A
  def val
    10
  end

  def test
    back = []
    x = val
    back << x
    val = x + 1
    back << val
    x = val
    back << x
  end
end

p A.new.test

then all is good, it prints [10, 11, 11] which means the first x = val calls the method, the second calls the local variable, presumably.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. this is a reasonable explanation. it also explains why it does not raise an exception in val = val. – akonsu Apr 3 '13 at 14:36

It's nil because val is the method you're trying to pass around and you're not calling val anywhere and it's overriding itself. You're stuck in a loop basically.

At the end of each function is an implicit return which returs the last value and if it has no value to return Ruby returns nil but you were perhaps expecting a function?

This is similar in Python where a function without a return always returns None.

This can be solved by turning the left hand val into a instance property with the @ connotation.

I'm guessing you want it to print 10 using the val() method?

def test
    @val = val()
end

puts A.new.test

Below is also valid:

def test
    val = self.val() #but this will produce the same as above to no real benefit.
end

The key being that you must call the val method in order for the val variable to get the value.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you. I would not say that I am stuck in a loop because the program terminates. I was expecting 10, not a function. Definitely this has something to do with parentheses. If my test method just has one line val then it returns 10. But the confusing part for me was that the assignment resulted in val being nil. – akonsu Apr 3 '13 at 14:15
    
Not really, it has more to do with the fact that you're trying to tell Ruby that val is itself. Which results in a loop where Ruby can't figure out what you want. – Henrik Andersson Apr 3 '13 at 14:20
    
there is no loop. the program terminates. I am confused. – akonsu Apr 3 '13 at 14:21

This should be split into two questions:

  1. When you have a = a, what is evaluated first? If you do echo 'p a = a' | ruby, you get nil, not undefined exception, so the definition comes first.

  2. What happens when a local variable has the same names as a method? Answer: method becomes invisible unless you use self.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.