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I'm building Tetris and trying to think about how I should rotate pieces.

Are they rotating on a single block? Or should they morph... aka swap positions?

enter image description here

The way I'm thinking of doing it is sort of hardcode... like (pseudocode):

if (rotateRight()) {

    if (Piece == "T") {
        if (Piece.getCurrRotation() == down (aka.. 180 degrees))
          move each Tile in Piece from the down rotation to the left rotation... each coordinate would be pre-specified for a given condition... aka lot's of hardcoding
     }
    if (Piece == "L") { etc...

     }
}
if (rotateLeft()) {
     perform same checks for the Left...
}

But this would seem to be a massssssive amount of code just to figure out

firstly) which rotation the current piece is at (there's 4 possible rotations for each piece)

secondly) From there... set it to the new hardcoded coordinates based on that piece

I'd have to do that for each piece... that seems like the wrong way to think about it.

Any other thoughts?

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closed as too localized by artbristol, Patrick, Perception, Steven Penny, Graviton Apr 7 '13 at 8:44

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2  
Is there any reason you need to know where each block is in relation to the others? – Chris Cooper Apr 3 '13 at 14:32
1  
I don't know how much of your code is pseudo, but in Java, variables don't begin with a capital letter - and you shouldn't compare strings using ==. – kba Apr 3 '13 at 14:34
1  
Why not just have a rotate method in your Piece class, which you implement for each sub-Piece class and which you call from your controller. That avoids that large switch-like-statement – Robin Apr 3 '13 at 14:36
2  
I would pre-compute all 28 pieces (7 pieces, 4 rotations), then just keep them in a 4 member array. if you rotate left, subtract one from the array counter (wrap around, of course). And vice versa for the right rotation. – Kylar Apr 3 '13 at 14:44
2  
Why not? There's only 28. It's a very small number, and pre-computing them all will probably save you time overall, as well as a bunch of complex math. – Kylar Apr 3 '13 at 14:49
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would probably have 1-4 Orientation objects for each PieceType object. Each Orientation would then define positions of actual blocks (relative to some pivot). For instance

PieceType "L":

    Orientation 1:
    #
    #
    ##

    Orientation 2:
    ###
    #

    Orientation 3:
    ##
     #
     #

    Orientation 4:
      #
    ###

PieceType "I":

    Orientation 1:
    #
    #
    #
    #

    Orientation 2:
    ####

Each PieceType could also hold information about the space needed for each possible "change of Orientation" (i.e. rotation). This is all static information, so there's really no need to move blocks around during the game. Just change the Orientation of the Piece and let the Orientation object tell you the block positions.

share|improve this answer
    
The thing with this is... At runtime, the game calls Piece class' int[] getShape(String shape) { method which says, for example, if (shape == "L") { pieceCoordinates = new int[] {0, 1, 0, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2}; it will set those points on the board. If I precompute each orientation, how can I set them where they need to be on the board? – Growler Apr 3 '13 at 15:04
1  
@Growler If you have each orientation saved as a group of coordinate pairs (x,y), you can just add the current piece coordinate to each of those. – kba Apr 3 '13 at 15:31
1  
Also you have to think about the rotation center. Storing the shape is not enough. Imagine how you rotate PieceType "I" from Orientation 1 into Orientation 2 and back. – GaborSch Apr 3 '13 at 15:31
    
That's a good point. Because I would rotate on an axis... so Orientation 1 (straight up) wouldn't be the same as if it was on it's third rotation down. – Growler Apr 3 '13 at 15:42
    
@Growler: You need to store the block positions relative to some pivot. – COME FROM Apr 4 '13 at 5:34

If you have the pieces stored as a matrix you can rotate the matrix with a generic function. Say you want to rotate [[1, 1, 1], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]] 90 degrees to the left -> [[1,0,0], [1,0,0], [1,0,0]]. Does that help?

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You have 2 options (depending how you store your shapes):

  • Do the rotation runtime (keep your shape points in a matrix, and rotate around the center) with repositioning your shape block.
  • Store 4 (or for rotation-invariant shapes, 2 or even 1) phases for the shape, and only increase/decrease the phase your shape is in.

In the first version you have to calculate runtime, find the center of your shape, etc.

In the second version you have to make pre-calculations, and hard-code the shapes.

I think the second approach is better, since you have a fixed number of pieces, and fixed number of phases. But it's up to you.

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That example code looks like a nightmare in the making.

The other way to do this, that would be super simple, would be to treat the board as a fixed number of cells and then just treat each 'rotation' as a way of computing how much each piece's position should be shifted, then just reseat the pieces, as it were, then have them draw themselves, so from the perspective of the pieces, they are just told: 'ok, you are now at A5.'

If you look at your first example, the new locations are simply a function of their present offset from center and the desired direction of rotation.

Best thing about this approach is you are not running around doing a ton of hideous case statements, and making god object code that will be completely unsustainable.

share|improve this answer
    
Mind giving a quick example? – Growler Apr 3 '13 at 19:22
    
Sure. Does the block always have a center piece? (both your examples do). (I've played Tetris a few times, but not many.. :) )... – Rob Apr 3 '13 at 21:17
    
I don't think they would need to – Growler Apr 3 '13 at 21:31
    
@Growler well rotations occur on an axis, so even if you don't have a block there, there has to be an implied center, right? So you are saying you could have a block like your first one that only has 1 and 4 present? – Rob Apr 3 '13 at 21:48

IMHO, the easiest way is not to rotate or transform the block, but to remember the block shape in each of its state (normal, rotated_90_degrees, rotated_180_degrees, rotated_270_degrees)

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I would suggest that you define a piece as points relative to a single point of rotation. You can then (with a little matrix algebra) apply a simple rotation 3 times to get the other layouts relative to the centre point.

Rotation is then unsetting the current points from the displayed game, switching to the next rotation and then reapplying the new points to the displayed game.

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