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I'm trying to evaluate the performance of simple GPU elementwise matrix operations with ArrayFire.

In particular, considering

int N1 = something;
int N2 = something;

array A_D = constant(1.,N1*N2,1,f64);
array B_D = constant(1.,N1*N2,1,f64);
array C_D = constant(1.,N1*N2,1,f64);
array D_D = constant(1.,N1*N2,1,f64);

I would like to perform the timing of the following instruction

D_D = A_D + B_D + C_D + 3.;

I'm using two approaches. The first one is

timer  time_last;
time_last = timer::start();

D_D = A_D + B_D + C_D + 3.;

double elapsed = timer::stop(time_last);
printf("elapsed time using start and stop = %g ms \n",1000.*elapsed);

The second one is defining the following function

void timing_test()
{
    int N1 = something;
int N2 = something;

    array A_D = constant(1.,N1*N2,1,f64);
    array B_D = constant(1.,N1*N2,1,f64);
    array C_D = constant(1.,N1*N2,1,f64);
    array D_D = constant(1.,N1*N2,1,f64);

    D_D = A_D + B_D + C_D + 3.;
}

and then calling

printf("elapsed time using timeit %g ms \n", 1000.*timeit(timing_test));

I have obtained the following results:

(N1,N2)=(256,256) first approach = 0.0456ms second approach = 0.264ms

(N1,N2)=(512,512) first approach = 0.0451ms second approach = 0.264ms

(N1,N2)=(1024,1024) first approach = 0.0457ms second approach = 0.263ms

(N1,N2)=(2048,2048) first approach = 0.127ms second approach = 0.265ms

I'm also using the following "hand-coded" version of the expression according to

cudaEventCreate(&start);
cudaEventCreate(&stop);
cudaEventRecord(start, 0);

eval_matrix_wrap_handcoded(A_D,B_D,C_D,D_D,N1*N2);

cudaEventRecord(stop, 0);
cudaEventSynchronize(stop);
cudaEventElapsedTime(&time, start, stop);

template <class T1, class T2, class T3, class T4>
__global__ inline void evaluation_matrix_handcoded(T1 *A_D, T2 *B_D, T3 *C_D, T4 *D_D, int NumElements)
{
    const int i = blockDim.x * blockIdx.x + threadIdx.x;
    if(i < NumElements) D_D[i]=A_D[i]+B_D[i]+C_D[i]+3.;
}

__host__ void eval_matrix_wrap_handcoded(double *A_D, double *B_D, double *C_D, double *D_D, int NumElements)
{
    dim3 dimGrid(iDivUp(NumElements,dimBlock.x));
    evaluation_matrix_handcoded<<<dimGrid,dimBlock>>>(A_D,B_D,C_D,D_D,NumElements);
}

obtaining the following

(N1,N2)=(256,256) 0.0897ms

(N1,N2)=(512,512) 0.339ms

(N1,N2)=(1024,1024) 1.3ms

(N1,N2)=(2048,2048) 5.37ms

The strange thing is that

  1. The results of the two approaches are different. This could be due to a function call overhead, but it is anyway strange that this overhead changes when (N1,N2)=(2048,2048).
  2. The results of the two approaches are almost independent on the matrix sizes.
  3. The results are much different as compared to a "hand-coded" version of the expression (I'm assuming a library should have a productivity-performance trade-off).

Note that, before any operation, I'm warming up the GPU using the code

array test1(1,5);
test1(0,0)=1;
test1(0,1)=2;
test1(0,2)=3;
test1(0,3)=4;
test1(0,4)=5;

Could someone help me interpreting the above results? Thanks.

EDIT FOLLOWING PAVAN'S ANSWER

First method modified to

timer  time_last;
time_last = timer::start();

D_D = A_D + B_D + C_D + 3.;
D_D.eval();
af::sync();

double elapsed = timer::stop(time_last);
printf("elapsed time using start and stop = %g ms \n",1000.*elapsed);

Second method modified to

void timing_test()
{
    int N1 = something;
    int N2 = something;

    array A_D = constant(1.,N1*N2,1,f64);
    array B_D = constant(1.,N1*N2,1,f64);
    array C_D = constant(1.,N1*N2,1,f64);
    array D_D = constant(1.,N1*N2,1,f64);

    D_D = A_D + B_D + C_D + 3.;
    D_D.eval();
}

However, the timing now is

`(N1,N2)=(256,256)`  first approach = `14.7ms`  second approach = `2.04ms`

`(N1,N2)=(512,512)`  first approach = `14.3ms`  second approach = `2.04ms`

`(N1,N2)=(1024,1024)`  first approach = `14.09ms`  second approach = `2.04ms`

`(N1,N2)=(2048,2048)`  first approach = `16.47ms`  second approach = `2.04ms`

and I still have different timings and independent on the vectors size.

If I modify the first method to

D_D = A_D + B_D + C_D + 3.;
D_D.eval();

timer  time_last;
time_last = timer::start();

D_D = A_D + B_D + C_D + 3.;
D_D.eval();
af::sync();

double elapsed = timer::stop(time_last);
printf("elapsed time using start and stop = %g ms \n",1000.*elapsed);

namely, I "increase" the GPU warm-up stage, the I obtain, for the first method,

`(N1,N2)=(256,256)`  `0.19ms`

`(N1,N2)=(512,512)`  `0.42ms`

`(N1,N2)=(1024,1024)`  `1.18ms`

`(N1,N2)=(2048,2048)`  `4.2ms`

which appears more reasonable to me since the timing depend on the data size and is closer to hand-coding.

SECOND EDIT To summarize: I have accounted for the answer and the comment and, for the first approach, I'm using

D_D = A_D + B_D + C_D + 3.;
D_D.eval();

timer  time_last;
af::sync();
time_last = timer::start();

D_D = A_D + B_D + C_D + 3.;
D_D.eval();
af::sync();

double elapsed = timer::stop(time_last);
printf("elapsed time using start and stop = %g ms \n",1000.*elapsed);

I'm obtaining the following (new) results:

`(N1,N2)=(256,256)`  `0.18ms`

`(N1,N2)=(512,512)`  `0.30ms`

`(N1,N2)=(1024,1024)`  `0.66ms`

`(N1,N2)=(2048,2048)`  `2.18ms`
share|improve this question

ArrayFire uses just in time compiler for element wise operations (this includes arithmetic, logical, trignometric and other math operations).

This means something like

D_D = A_D + B_D + C_D + 3.;

is stored as an expression until the value of D_D is requested by the user or another non-jit function.

You can force evaluation of these expressions if you use the af::eval() function or the eval() method.

So for your particular problem, please use D_D.eval() for both methods. You will need to do af::sync() also for the first method. timeit() does not need to be synchronized explicitly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your answer. I have applied your suggestions, but it seems I have still problems. I have further edited my post to present the latest results. It seems that, if I "increase the amount" of GPU warm-up, then I obtain more reasonable results. Are those the definitive timings. Am I missing anything? – JackOLantern Apr 4 '13 at 9:53
    
@JackOLantern I should have mentioned that. The first approach needs to be warmed up once (the just in time compiler needs to generate the required kernel). Also add an af::sync() before the first timer::start(). – Pavan Yalamanchili Apr 4 '13 at 14:16
    
Thanks. I have updated my post with the new results including the additional af::sync() you recommended. They look reasonable, as the timing increases with the vectors' size. But should I now do any action for the timeit case (second approach) to obtain similar results? I do still get a constant timing of 2ms. Thanks in advance for any further help. – JackOLantern Apr 4 '13 at 19:03

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