Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a following table of dates:

dateID INT (PK),
personID INT (FK),
date DATE,
starttime VARCHAR, --Always in a format of 'HH:MM'

What I want to do is I want to pull rows (all columns, including PK) with lowest date (primary condition) and starttime (secondary condition) for every person. For example, if we have

row1(date = '2013-04-01' and starttime = '14:00')

and

row2(date = '2013-04-02' and starttime = '08:00')

row1 will be retrieved, along with all other columns.

So far I have come up with gradual filtering the table, but it`s quite a mess. Is there more efficient way of doing this?

Here is what I made so far:

    SELECT 
    D.id
    , D.personid
    , D.date        
    , D.starttime 
FROM table D 
JOIN (
        SELECT --Select lowest time from the subset of lowest dates
            A.personid, 
            B.startdate, 
            MIN(A.starttime) AS starttime 
        FROM table A 
        JOIN (
                SELECT --Select lowest date for every person to exclude them from outer table
                    personid
                    , MIN(date) AS startdate
                FROM table
                GROUP BY personid
            ) B
        ON A.personid = B.peronid
        AND A.date = B.startdate
        GROUP BY 
            A.personid, 
            B.startdate
    ) C
ON C.personid = D.personid
AND C.startdate = D.date 
AND C.starttime = D.starttime

It works, but I think there is a more clean/efficient way to do this. Any ideas?

EDIT: Let me expand a question - I also need to extract maximum date (only date, without time) for each person.

The result should look like this:

id
personid
max(date) for each person
min(date) for each person
min(starttime) for min(date) for each person

It is a part of a much larger query (the resulting table is joined with it), and the resulting table must be lightweight enough so that the query won`t execute for too long. With single join with this table (just using min, max for each field I wanted) the query took about 3 seconds, and I would like the resulting query not to take longer than 2-3 times that.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you should be able to do this like:

select a.dateID, a.personID, a.date, a.max_date, a.starttime
  from (select t.*, 
               max(t.date) over (partition by t.personID) max_date,
               row_number() over (partition by t.personID 
                                  order by t.date, t.starttime) rn
          from table t) a
 where a.rn = 1;

sample data added to fiddle: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!4/63c45/1

share|improve this answer
    
The answer is nice, but it is very ineffective when combined with the rest of my query. –  kyooryu Apr 4 '13 at 10:55
    
@kyooryu perhaps if you showed the rest of your query? as what you posted, is the same as the answer i provided in terms of results. you can alter the fiddle example and post the fiddle here for us to see. –  DazzaL Apr 4 '13 at 11:10
    
Im afraid I cant show much more of the query than I already posted. I expanded the question a bit though, so you can see what is the result I`ll be joining the the rest of the query. –  kyooryu Apr 4 '13 at 11:19
    
@kyooryu ok, so all that is missing form the query i provided is max(dte) for a person , right (as a.date is really the min date). see edit –  DazzaL Apr 4 '13 at 11:49
    
The performance is more or less satisfactory with this solution, thanks for the help. –  kyooryu Apr 4 '13 at 20:39

This is the query you can use and no need to incorporate in your query. You can also use @Dazzal's query as stand alone

SELECT ID, PERSONID, DATE, STARTTIME
(
SELECT ID, PERONID, DATE, STARTTIME, ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY personid ORDER BY     STARTTIME, DATE) AS RN
FROM TABLE 
) A
WHERE 
RN = 1
share|improve this answer
select a.id,a.accomp, a.accomp_name, a.start_year,a.end_year, a.company
  from (select t.*, 
               min(t.start_year) over (partition by t.company) min_date,
               max(t.end_year) over (partition by t.company) max_date,
               row_number() over (partition by t.company 
                                  order by t.end_year desc) rn
          from temp_123 t) a
 where a.rn = 1;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.