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I have a number of vector classes for which I'd like to implement a generic stream operator like this:

template <typename T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const T& v)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < T::num_elems; ++i)
    {
        os << " " << v.a[i];
    }
    return os;
}

This almost works, except that I get an error for os << " " << ... of course, because it's ambiguous. How can I disambiguate this and force the << operator from std:: to be used here ?

Alternatively, how can I restrict the use of this templated stream operator to just my vector classes ? I've put the vector classes and the stream operator into a separate namespace but that doesn't seem to be enough.

The start of the actual error message:

foo.cpp:73: error: ambiguous overload for 'operator<<' in 'os << " "'
/usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:169:0 /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:169: note: candidates are: std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(long int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>] <near match>
/usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:177:0 /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:177: note:                 std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(long unsigned int) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>] <near match>
/usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:185:0 /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/ostream:185: note:                 std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>& std::basic_ostream<_CharT, _Traits>::operator<<(bool) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>]
...

Some further clarification: the stream operator is only being used in a test harness (UnitTest++), it's not part of a public API. Also the vector classes are small custom fixed size vectors (really just simple arrays), not C++ vectors.

A stripped down example of one of the vector classes that I need this to work with:

struct VectorClass {
    enum { num_elems = 16 };
    int32_t a[num_elems];
};
share|improve this question
    
it will likely always be ambiguous for most standard libraries, as they surely use templates at certain places too. –  PlasmaHH Apr 3 '13 at 15:50
    
@DyP: thanks - could you expand on how I'd use a qualified-id here exactly ? –  Paul R Apr 3 '13 at 15:50
4  
This is a dangerous function declaration, since it claims to be used for os << ANYTHING. –  Drew Dormann Apr 3 '13 at 15:52
1  
Can you give an example of what those vector classes look like –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Apr 3 '13 at 15:57
1  
@PaulR your example VectorClass class doesn't need a template function. The problem we're trying to solve is "How are all the types similar?" That can't be solved with one example type. –  Drew Dormann Apr 3 '13 at 16:08
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

IIRC, you can use SFINAE (like in Drew Dormann's answer) or argument-dependent name lookup using namespaces:

namespace all_my_vectors
{
    struct myVector1 { int a; };
    struct myVector2 { int a; };

    template < typename Vector >
    std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream& o, Vector const& v)
    {
        o << v.a; // look up name in std::ostream, namespace std, global namespace, namespace of v.a
        return o;
    }
}

int main()            
{
    all_my_vectors::myVector1 v1;
    all_my_vectors::myVector2 v2;

    std::cout << v1 << v2; // look up name in std::ostream, namespace std, global namespace, namespace all_my_vectors

    return 0;
}

Edit: If they share a common base class, you should use stardust_'s approach.

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there are around 20 similar classes, with different POD types and array sizes, but otherwise the same.

Create a named function that does the generalized work.

template <typename T>
std::ostream& SendVectorToOstream(std::ostream& os, const T& v)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < T::num_elems; ++i)
    {
        os << " " << v.a[i];
    }
    return os;
}

Now you can have your operator<< functions forward to it.

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const VectorClassA & v)
{
    return SendVectorToOstream( os, v );
}

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const VectorClassB & v)
{
    return SendVectorToOstream( os, v );
}

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const VectorClassC & v)
{
    return SendVectorToOstream( os, v );
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - I should have been clearer in my question: (a) the stream operator is only being used in a test harness (UnitTest++), it's not part of a public API and (b) the vector classes are small custom fixed size vectors (really just simple arrays), not C++ vectors. –  Paul R Apr 3 '13 at 15:59
    
@PaulR Sorry - I can't improve on this answer without knowing the type to replace std::vector<T> with. –  Drew Dormann Apr 3 '13 at 16:01
    
Thanks - I'll add an example to the question shortly. –  Paul R Apr 3 '13 at 16:02
    
Thanks for the update - this still requires one stream operator per class though (although they are simpler now) –  Paul R Apr 3 '13 at 16:58
add comment

I think you are looking the wrong way. Template is not the solution. What you want is Inheritance. Something like this

template< typename T>
struct VectorClass {


    enum { num_elems = 4 };
    T* a;

};


template< typename T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const VectorClass<T>& v)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < VectorClass<T>::num_elems; ++i)
        {
            os << " " << v.a[i];
        }
        return os;
    }


template< typename T>
class DerivedClass : public VectorClass<T> {

};




int main(){

    DerivedClass<int> v;

    int* tmp = new int[VectorClass<int>::num_elems];

    for (int i = 0; i < VectorClass<int>::num_elems; ++i) {
        tmp[i] = i;
    }

    v.a = tmp;

    cout << v;

}
share|improve this answer
    
Doing it this way would mean having the same stream operator in all classes. –  Paul R Apr 3 '13 at 16:15
2  
If they derive from Vectorclass then they don't have to define it. –  user995502 Apr 3 '13 at 16:20
    
Yes, thanks, that might be the way to go. –  Paul R Apr 3 '13 at 16:40
    
I have edited it. take a look. –  user995502 Apr 3 '13 at 16:43
    
@stardust_ No reason to make it a friend function; it accesses no private members of VectorClass. –  Billy ONeal Apr 3 '13 at 16:43
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If all of your vector classes have a common attribute, such as num_elems, you can implement this using SFINAE.

template <typename T,          size_t SFINAE = T::num_elems >
// The only difference is here ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream &os, const T& v)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < T::num_elems; ++i)
    {
        os << " " << v.a[i];
    }
    return os;
}

This change forces this ostream << to only apply to types T that define a T::num_elems that can be converted to size_t, like your enum.

This solution assumes a C++11 compiler.

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1  
Note that this requires default values for function templates, a C++11 feature. Note also that this allows someone to specify the SFIANE parameter explicitly, which is probably undesired. –  Billy ONeal Apr 3 '13 at 16:53
    
@BillyONeal You mean if someone called the function as operator << < Vector, 42 >( os, v ) instead of os << v? That's inconsequential to the function's behavior. Although someone should probably have a talk with the author. :) –  Drew Dormann Apr 3 '13 at 17:07
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