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Here is my server code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <pthread.h>

#define MY_PORT     843
#define MAXBUF      1028
#define NUM_THREADS     2

int pipes[1][2];
int sockfd;

const char *policy =
"<?xml version=\"1.0\"?>\n"
"<!DOCTYPE cross-domain-policy SYSTEM \"/xml/dtds/cross-domain-policy.dtd\">\n"
"<cross-domain-policy>\n"
"<site-control permitted-cross-domain-policies=\"master-only\"/>\n"
"<allow-access-from domain=\"*\" to-ports=\"*\" />\n</cross-domain-policy>\r\n";

void *SendPolicy(void *threadid) {
   int ok, clientfd;
   long tid;
   char buffer[MAXBUF];
   tid = (long) threadid;
   while(1) {
    /* --- Wait for, and recieve a client ---- */
    read(pipes[tid][0], &clientfd, sizeof(int), 0);

    /* --- Recieve --- */
    recv(clientfd, buffer, 128, 0);

    /* --- Send --- */
    send(clientfd, &policy, 250, 0);

    /* --- Close ---*/
    close(clientfd);
   }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    /* --- Create worker threads --- */
    pthread_t threads[NUM_THREADS];
    int t;
    for(t=0; t<NUM_THREADS; t++) {
        pipe(pipes[t]); // <- Create pipes for sending clients
        pthread_create(&threads[t], NULL, SendPolicy, (void *)t);
    }

    /* --- Create streaming socket --- */
    if ((sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0)) < 0)  {
    perror("Socket");
    return 1;
    }

    /* --- Initialize address/port structure --- */
    struct sockaddr_in self;
    self.sin_family = AF_INET;
    self.sin_port = htons(MY_PORT);
    self.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
    self.sin_family = AF_INET;

    /* --- Assign a port number to the socket --- */
    if (bind(sockfd, (struct sockaddr*) &self, sizeof(self)) != 0 ) {
    perror("Error: socket bind");
    return 1;
    }

    /* --- Make it a "listening socket" --- */
    if ( listen(sockfd, 20) != 0 )    {
    perror("socket--listen");
    return 1;
    }

    struct sockaddr_in client_addr;
    int addrlen=sizeof(client_addr);
    int clientfd;
    int current_thread = 0;
    while (1) {
        /* --- Accept a client --- */
    clientfd = accept(sockfd, (struct sockaddr*)&client_addr, &addrlen);

    /* --- Send the client to a worker thread --- */
    write(pipes[current_thread][1], &clientfd, sizeof(int), 0);

    /* --- Cycle the threads --- */
    current_thread++;
    if (current_thread == NUM_THREADS)
        current_thread = 0;
    }

    /* --- Clean up --- */
    close(sockfd);
    pthread_exit(NULL);
    return 0;
}

Originally, I wrote this planning to use 5 threads, yet I found the biggest gain with just a single thread. Much more so than no threads at all:

Concurrency Level:      1000
Time taken for tests:   12.607 seconds
Complete requests:      10000
Failed requests:        0
Write errors:           0
Total transferred:      2500000 bytes
HTML transferred:       0 bytes
Requests per second:    793.23 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       1260.672 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       1.261 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          193.66 [Kbytes/sec] received

This is very confusing for me and I don't understand why having only 1 thread can be so faster than no threads, or 2, 3, 4, 5 threads, etc.

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The main thread is also a thread, so even if you call pthread_create only once in reality you have 2 threads, the main thread and the one you create, therefore the difference between "1 thread" and no threads.

As for 2+ threads, you have to take into account the overhead of having multiple threads, switching between threads is usually cheaper than switching between processes but is not zero.

share|improve this answer
    
but I'm talking magnatudes of 100x, not magnatudes of 2x (for 0 threads and 1 thread), and very small improvements quickly down to very poor results for 3+ threads – andychase Apr 3 '13 at 18:13
    
Where are you initialising current_thread? – Jorge Núñez Apr 3 '13 at 18:21
    
3rd line under main() int t, current_thread; – andychase Apr 3 '13 at 21:04
    
Yeah, you declare it there but I don't see any initialisation. You use it later but is never given a first value as far as I can see. If you are compiling with warnings it should have given you one for this. It could be unrelated to your problem, but with that problem, cycling of the threads is probably not working properly, neither the access to the pipes, since current_thread would hold whatever was on that memory position before (could be zero by chance of course). – Jorge Núñez Apr 3 '13 at 21:26
    
Hey thanks, I didn't even notice that. Unfortunately it only made it a lot faster making me even more confused. Oh well. – andychase Apr 4 '13 at 3:11

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