Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

First, let's see the following picture that explain the concept of .Net RIA Service.

alt text

As you see, the application has app logic (business rule) that can be implemented both server side (databases + Repositories + external services) and client side (asp.net web page + Silverlight + WCF)

Next, I create some data class that contains some validation rule.

namespace [SolutionName].Models
{
    public interface IUser
    {
        Guid ID { get; set; }

        [Required]
        [StringLength(15)]
        [RegularExpression("^[a-zA-Z][a-zA-Z_]+$")]
        string LoginName { get; set; }

        [Required]
        [StringLength(255)]
        string HashedPassword { get; set; }

        DateTime CreateTime { get; set; }

        [StringLength(255)]
        string Description { get; set; }

        [Required]
        Role Role { get; set; }
    }
}

After that, I create some custom Model Binder for validating data when users post it to controllers. So, I can ensure that every Model is valid before I save it.

public ActionResult SaveData()
{
    if(ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        // logic for saving data
    }
    else
    {
        // logic for displaying error message
    }
}

However, some view page doesn't require all of fields in data type. It needs some of field in data type. I can't separate this data type into multiple interfaces depend on what data field that view page requires. Because some of data fields are duplicate. Moreover, it will separate app logic too.

For example

  1. LogOn view uses only 2 fields, including LogOnName and HashedPassword.
  2. ChangePassword view use only 2 fields, including Id and HashedPassword.
  3. UserProfile view uses 4 field, including ID, LogOnName, HashedPassword and Description.


Do you have any idea for solving this problem? I think it much like AOP concept.

By the way, I can solve this by adding a list field that contains unused fields. But this idea is quite bad when I use it with a large data type that contains more than 100 fields.

namespace [SolutionName].Models
{
    public interface IUser
    {
        /*
            Some defined data type
        */

        // All fields that is contained in this list won't be validated by defined rules.
        List<string> unusedFields { get;set; }
    }
}

Thanks,

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

The fundamental issue here seems to be one of the following:

  1. Contextual validation rules are being expressed as invariants
  2. Entities with unsatisfied invariants are being prematurely created/validated

I would suggest that you don't attempt using Model Binders to instantiate and validate types for which all invariant information isn't obtainable from the Http request. In the case of LogOn, the only information you have is the user's name and password. Therefore, LogOn shouldn't expect a User type, but rather the username and password, perhaps encapsulated in a Credentials type.

share|improve this answer
    
In my example, it’s very easy to separate it into 2-3 data fields. However, in real world application, it's impossible to separate it. Because you cannot ensure that if you change some field name in the database, it will not affect any views. Moreover, validation rules must be duplicated too that bring complication to me for maintenance it. –  Soul_Master Oct 18 '09 at 5:36
    
You didn't give any detail on how your domain model relates to your database, but they shouldn't be coupled such that changes to field names within the database affect your views. Concerning validation, you can still centralize your rules by encapsulating them within validators if needed. In the log in scenario, however, best practices dictate that minimal feedback is given if the user provides incorrect criteria. The validation for username and password will also generally be different between log on and user creation scenarios. –  Derek Greer Oct 18 '09 at 14:40
    
My core problem is I don't want to write some JavaScript or any client script for validating some silly logic (some logic that don’t related with other rows or object) like require field, string max length or whatever. Because it can't check that is valid or not at build time. This concept is much like validation. As your suggestion, I do not like to create a rule validator because its logic will be written in the data access layer. Thanks. PS. error message will be selected in view layer depends on what error occurs. –  Soul_Master Oct 18 '09 at 17:12
    
I'm not sure what you mean by your JavaScript comment, but what I'm suggesting is that removing contextual validation concerns from your business object need not cause duplication if it is encapsulated within a validator. You should explore some of the validation frameworks available such as the Validation Application Block, NHibernate Validator, etc. None that I've seen have anything to do with being coupled to a data access layer. –  Derek Greer Oct 18 '09 at 22:19
    
Additionally, concerning your comment about the error message being selected depending on what error occurs, the scenarios you've described should require contextual validation. For example, log on might have an error message of "The username/password supplied were incorrect" while user registration/password change might have an error message of "The password must be between N1 and N2 in length, contain N special characters, ..." This can't be achieved by expressing validation rules as invariant conditions on your business object. –  Derek Greer Oct 18 '09 at 22:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.