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recreating this at the request of Charles Duffy with a more narrow focus.

I have a CSV file that looks like the following:

Security Policy: Blahblahblah,,,,,,,,,
12,,host_A,net-B,https,drop,Log,Any,Any,comments
13,,host_A,net-B,smtp,drop,Log,Any,Any,comments
14,,host_A,net-B,http,accept,Log,Any,Any,comments 
,,net-C,,,,,,,
,,net-D,,,,,,,
15,,host_A,net-B,http,accept,Log,Any,Any,comments
,,host_B,net-C,service_X,,,,,
,,host_C,net-D,service_y,,,,,
,,host_D,,,,,,,
,,host_E,,,,,,,

I need to parse each value separately, however I need to include $1 in their respective statements. As you can see, this is easy for 13 & 14, however it becomes a serious problem for 14&15 when their columns are blank (children).

What is the best way to loop over this?

For example, I'd like the output to look like:

'text goes here' $1 'more text' $3 'more text'
'text goes here' $1 'more text' $4 'more text'

etc.

Using real values (for 15):

'text goes here' 15 'more text' host_A 'more text'
'text goes here' 15 'more text' host_B 'more text'
'text goes here' 15 'more text' host_C 'more text'
'text goes here' 15 'more text' host_D 'more text'
'text goes here' 15 'more text' host_E 'more text'
'text goes here' 15 'other text' net-B 'more text'
'text goes here' 15 'other text' net-C 'more text'
'text goes here' 15 'other text' net-D 'more text'
'text goes here' 15 'text' http 'more text'
'text goes here' 15 'text' service_X 'more text'
'text goes here' 15 'text' service_y'more text'

So on and so forth.

Thank you,

share|improve this question
    
To be clear -- you want the columns to carry down when they aren't set? –  Charles Duffy Apr 3 '13 at 16:17
    
Correct - easiest way of thinking about them is that they're children –  Numpty Apr 3 '13 at 16:19
    
Why say anything about "sed" in the question? –  Charles Duffy Apr 3 '13 at 16:23
    
The "children" nomenclature doesn't make things easier to me; rather, I'd argue that it muddles the question. (Nothing in your specified logic/behavior makes column 1 special, either, making the question's title somewhat misleading). –  Charles Duffy Apr 3 '13 at 16:28
    
This question didn't cover it, by the way, but (knowing some of the context from your other question) you can check whether a previous value has been seen before in a high-performance manner using bash's associative arrays. –  Charles Duffy Apr 3 '13 at 16:48

2 Answers 2

process_file() {
  # declare local variables
  declare -a last_seen row
  declare col_idx col

  read # discard first line

  while IFS=, read -r -a row; do
    # for each remaining line...
    for col_idx in "${!row[@]}"; do
      # update last-seen rows with any contents here
      col=${row[$col_idx]}
      if [[ $col ]]; then
        last_seen[$col_idx]=$col
      fi
    done

    # ...and operate on those values.
    printf 'text goes here %s more text %s more text\n' \
      "${last_seen[0]}" "${last_seen[2]}" "${last_seen[3]}"
  done
}

process_file <input.csv >output.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. How would I differentiate based on the contents of each column? For instance, a value in $3 requires different text to be output versus a value in $4. Awk seems like a better/easier tool, I just don't know how to do this with it (I know it's possible to do however) –  Numpty Apr 3 '13 at 16:24
    
If you wanted to skip any row for which the third column didn't have foo in it, you would put the following directly under the operate on those values comment: [[ ${last_seen[2]} != *foo* ]] && continue. You can do your own logic on other columns similarly. –  Charles Duffy Apr 3 '13 at 16:25
    
I'm not sure this is the "best" way of doing this. It works, however it's not really scalable when there are hundreds/thousands of variables I need to worry about. I'll give you a +1, but I'm going to see if someone can do it in awk. Thank you –  Numpty Apr 3 '13 at 16:29
    
@Numpty How would awk be "more scalable"? It'd be the same big-O magnitude algorithm either way. bash is indeed slower than awk, but it's not that much slower unless you start doing silly things like re-opening output files every time you want to write an additional line to them or calling external tools for string manipulation rather than using bash's built-in operations. (This is part of why calling grep or sed inside of an inner loop is frowned on in better company). –  Charles Duffy Apr 3 '13 at 16:39
    
...also, by "hundreds or thousands of variables", do you mean "hundreds or thousands of lines"? This code scales O(n) with additional lines -- the exact same way awk would. –  Charles Duffy Apr 3 '13 at 16:41

I'm really guessing as your question doesn't explain what you want very well but is something like this what you're looking for:

$ cat file
Security Policy: Blahblahblah,,,,,,,,,
12,,host_A,net-B,https,drop,Log,Any,Any,comments
13,,host_A,net-B,smtp,drop,Log,Any,Any,comments
14,,host_A,net-B,http,accept,Log,Any,Any,comments
,,net-C,,,,,,,
,,net-D,,,,,,,
15,,host_A,net-B,http,accept,Log,Any,Any,comments
,,host_B,net-C,service_X,,,,,
,,host_C,net-D,service_y,,,,,
,,host_D,,,,,,,
,,host_E,,,,,,,

$ awk -f tst.awk file
12  host_A net-B https drop Log Any Any comments
13  host_A net-B smtp drop Log Any Any comments
14  host_A net-B http accept Log Any Any comments
14  net-C net-B http accept Log Any Any comments
14  net-D net-B http accept Log Any Any comments
15  host_A net-B http accept Log Any Any comments
15  host_B net-C service_X accept Log Any Any comments
15  host_C net-D service_y accept Log Any Any comments
15  host_D net-B http accept Log Any Any comments
15  host_E net-B http accept Log Any Any comments

$ cat tst.awk
BEGIN{ FS="," }
NR==1 { next }
$1 != "" { split($0,dflt) }
{ for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) if ($i == "") $i = dflt[i]; print }
share|improve this answer
    
That's really pretty, but not quite. It looks like that just appends (correctly I might add) the correct number in $1 to the children. I need to create commands like you see here: stackoverflow.com/questions/15790315/… –  Numpty Apr 3 '13 at 17:29
    
OK, well update your question to show the expected output for your given sample input and I'll take another look. I'm not interested in looking back at old threads which must be inadequate somehow otherwise you wouldn't have started a new thread. –  Ed Morton Apr 3 '13 at 18:10
    
Other users didn't seem to have a problem with the old thread...Charles did though >.< Thank you either way –  Numpty Apr 3 '13 at 18:13
    
I saw the thread and couldn't figure out what you wanted so ignored it. I suspect others did that too since you have 59 views of the question so far but you only got one response and that wasn't from someone who usually responds to awk questions AFAIK. So rather than assuming no-one else had a problem with the question, consider that MAYBE Charles was just the only person to take the time to tell you about the problem. –  Ed Morton Apr 3 '13 at 18:16
    
You make a good point >.< –  Numpty Apr 3 '13 at 18:30

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