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I am practicing working with Linked List Nodes and have come upon a problem I don't know how to answer. How do you go about deleting the last node in a linked list. The code below works for all entry's bar the last node. The last does not get deleted.

Node Class

public class Node {

    private String data;
    private Node next;

    Node(String data, Node next)
    {
        this.data = data;
        this.next = next;
    }

    public void setData(String d)
    {
        data = d;
    }

    public void setNext(Node n)
    {
        next = n;
    }

    public String getData()
    {
        return data;
    }

    public Node getNext()
    {
        return next;
    }

Main

Node list = new Node("NODE 1",new Node("NODE 2",new Node("NODE 3", null)));
        list = insertSecond(list,"New Node");
        list = addLast(list,"LAST NODE");

        printList(list);
        System.out.println();
        deleteNode(list,"LAST NODE");
        printList(list);    
    }

    public static Node deleteNode(Node list,String str)
    {
        Node temp = list;
        Node prev = list;

        while(temp.getNext() != null)
        {
            if(temp.getData().equals(str))
            {
                if(prev.getNext() == null)
                    prev.setNext(null);
                else{
                prev.setNext(prev.getNext().getNext());
                }

            }
            prev = temp;
            temp = temp.getNext();
        }
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried to debug this? –  user714965 Apr 3 '13 at 16:20
    
prev.getNext() == null should be prev.getNext() != null. You're checking if it's null, then setting it to null. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Apr 3 '13 at 16:21
    
if(prev.getNext() == null) prev.setNext(null); makes no sense –  kenor Apr 3 '13 at 16:21
    
I know its not right but how do I set a pointer for the next node to null. –  Calgar99 Apr 3 '13 at 16:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would guess while(temp.getNext() != null) fails for your last element. The last element won't have a next element. So the last element is not compared against the passed string. You should trace this with the debugger.

share|improve this answer

It's easiest if you use a doubly-linked List, where your list knows both start and end.

Then you can just do something like this:

public void removeLastItem(){
    this.lastNode = this.lastNode.prev;
}
share|improve this answer

You need something like this:

public static Node deleteNode(Node list, String str) {
  Node temp = list;
  Node prev = list;

  do {
    if (temp.getData().equals(str)) {
      if (prev.getNext() == null) {
        prev.setNext(null);
      } else {
        prev.setNext(prev.getNext().getNext());
      }
    }
    prev = temp;
    temp = temp.getNext();
  } while (temp != null);

  return list;
}

You were stopping your loop too early.

BTW: if (prev.getNext() == null) { prev.setNext(null); ... doesn't make sense but I'll leave that bug to you.

share|improve this answer
    
Your right about if (prev.getNext() == null) { prev.setNext(null). Feeling pretty foolish about that. However is the do - while loop neccessary. It works with a regular while loop. Just want to make sure Im not missing anything. –  Calgar99 Apr 3 '13 at 16:33
    
@Calgar99 - You can use any loop form you like so long as you a) visit every node and b) correctly deal with head, tail, empty list and one-entry list. It is worth trying a do loop to achieve a) sometimes. –  OldCurmudgeon Apr 3 '13 at 20:29
    
Thanks for taking the time to help –  Calgar99 Apr 3 '13 at 22:48
while(temp != null){
  prev = temp;
  temp = temp.getNext();

}

prev.next = null;

Try this:

share|improve this answer

Deleting a node in a singly linked list

Assumptions

  1. Each node in the list has a nextNode pointer.
  2. The headOfList pointer points to the first node in the list.
  3. The next pointer of each node, that is already in the list, is correct.
  4. The next pointer of the last node in the list is some meaningful value (for instance, null).

Steps to implement

  1. If the list is empty, done. Desired node not found.
  2. If the first node is the desired node, set the headOfList pointer to the headOfList->nextNode value. Done. Desired node found.
  3. Set the currentNode pointer equal to the headOfList pointer value.
  4. If the currentNode node is the last node. Done. Desired node not found.
  5. If the currentNode->nextNode node is the desired node, set the currentNode->nextNode to the currentNode->nextNode->nextNode value. Done. Desired node found.
  6. goto step 4.

Notes

Since this is a singly linked list, you can not back up. Because of this, you need to point to the node parent and check to see if the the node child is the node that you wish to delete. There will be boundry conditions.

Some code

This is a member function of a LinkedList class. startOfList is a class member and points to the start of the linked list.

 public boolean delete(final String target)
    {
        if (startOfList != null)
        {
            if (StringUtils.equals(startOfList.getData(), target))
            {
                startOfList = startOfList.getNext();
                return true;
            }

            Node current = startOfList;

            for (Node next = current.getNext(); next != null; next = current.getNext())
            {
                if (StringUtils.equals(next.getData(), target))
                {
                    current.setNext(next.getNext());
                    return true;
                }
                else // advance one node.
                {
                    current = next;
                }
            }
        }

        return false;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
What is the appropriate way of setting headOfList-> nextNode. I was trying this but to no avail.if(temp.getData().equals(str)) { if(temp.getData().equals(list.getData())) { temp.setNext(temp.getNext()); } else { prev.setNext(prev.getNext().getNext()); } } –  Calgar99 Apr 3 '13 at 17:25
    
Delete the node before entering the loop. It is a boundary condition. –  DwB Apr 3 '13 at 17:42
    
Do you know what the appropriate syntax is? Sorry Ive been trying multiple approaches but I get the same result. –  Calgar99 Apr 3 '13 at 18:07

This is my attempt at it with assumption that last node's next variable will always be null:

public class LastNodeRemoval {

  private static class Node {
      String item;
      Node next;
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
      Node third = new Node();
      third.item = "Third";

      Node second = new Node();
      second.item = "Second";
      second.next = third;

      Node first = new Node();
      first.item = "First";
      first.next = second;

      removalLastNode(first);
   }

   private static void removalLastNode(Node first) {
      Node temp = first;

      while(temp.next.next != null) {
          temp = temp.next;
      }

      temp.next = null;

      System.out.println("Last node: "+temp.item);
   }

}
share|improve this answer

This can be done in a much simpler way by using the Java container class "LinkedList". The class LinkedList in Java implements the Deque (Double ended queue) interface which supports get/add/remove First/Last methods. An elementary code snippet follows:

LinkedList<Integer> list = new LinkedList<Integer>();
list.addFirst(1);
list.addLast(2);
System.out.println(list.removeLast());
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