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I have a data frame which consists of several rows with identical values in the column “name” but different values in the column “distance”. I would like to delete all rows with identical entries in “name” save for the one with the smallest distance. Is there an easier way than comparing all the rows with each other and check if their “name” entry is identical before comparing their “distance” value? The real data frame is about 14000 rows x 14 columns. I've looked for an answer but haven't found anything yet, so I’d be very thankful for any help!

This would be the original data frame:

     name      distance number
[1,] "apple"   "2.5"    "4"   
[2,] "banana"  "3"      "6"   
[3,] "apple"   "1"      "2"   
[4,] "satsuma" "4"      "8"   
[5,] "satsuma" "7.5"    "1"   
[6,] "melon"   "3"      "3"   
[7,] "satsuma" "1"      "6"  

This is what I'd like to get (not necessarily in this order):

     name      distance number
[1,] "banana"  "3"      "6"   
[2,] "apple"   "1"      "2"   
[3,] "melon"   "3"      "3"   
[4,] "satsuma" "1"      "6"   
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That's not a data.frame, rather it's a matrix. –  BondedDust Apr 3 '13 at 16:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First, sort the data.frame by name and distance, then mark rows to keep as the first ones for each name:

sorted <- dat[order(dat$name, dat$distance), ]

keep <- c(TRUE, head(sorted$name,-1) != tail(sorted$name,-1))

The result is

sorted[keep, ]
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I think we have a winner. –  BondedDust Apr 3 '13 at 16:58
    
Yeah this likely the fastest approach. +1 –  Tyler Rinker Apr 3 '13 at 17:09
    
Thanks a lot, it works and it's fast as well! –  atreju Apr 3 '13 at 17:14

You can use aggregate and merge like below

DF <- read.table(text='name      distance number
apple   2.5    4   
banana  3      6   
apple   1      2   
satsuma 4      8   
satsuma 7.5    1   
melon   3      3   
satsuma 1      6', header=TRUE)

merge(DF, aggregate(distance ~ name, data = DF, min))
##      name distance number
## 1   apple        1      2
## 2  banana        3      6
## 3   melon        3      3
## 4 satsuma        1      6
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Nice approach. Never would have thought of that. +1 –  Tyler Rinker Apr 3 '13 at 16:47

A couple of pointers to start:

Make your data as easy for others to read as possible. dput(head(your_data)) is a nice way to do that. And two your data is in a matrix rather than a dataframe so you have the least restrictive data type being character, so all your data is a character. I think storing it as a data.frame is better here because you have mixed data types. So right off the bat I read your data in as a dataframe and made sure the distance column was numeric.

dat <- read.table(text='
name      distance number
"apple"   "2.5"    "4"   
"banana"  "3"      "6"   
"apple"   "1"      "2"   
"satsuma" "4"      "8"   
"satsuma" "7.5"    "1"   
"melon"   "3"      "3"   
"satsuma" "1"      "6"', header=T)  

dat$distance <- as.numeric(dat$distance)


#split by grouping variable
splitdat <- split(dat, dat$name)

#find the minimum distance and index that 
out <- lapply(splitdat, function(x) {
    x[which.min(x$distance), ]
})

#put it all back together as a data frame
data.frame(do.call(rbind, out), row.names=NULL)

This is one of many approaches.

share|improve this answer
    
Useful newb-advice. The lapply(split(..,..)) paradigm is very similar to the by I used. –  BondedDust Apr 3 '13 at 17:02
    
Thanks for the answer and the advice! This was my first question here and I tried to make it as generic as possible (my real data is a data frame and not a matrix). –  atreju Apr 3 '13 at 17:12

I see @geektrader's aggregate-merge approach, but wonder if the merge might be might be CPU and memory intensive:

do.call(rbind, by( DF, DF['name'], function(d) d[which.min(d$distance), ] ) )
           name distance number
apple     apple        1      2
banana   banana        3      6
melon     melon        3      3
satsuma satsuma        1      6
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