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How would I skip say line 9 while I'm parsing a text file?

Here's what I got

use strict; use warnings;
open(my $fh, '<', 'file.txt') or die $!;
my $skip = 1;
while (<$fh>){
    $_=~ s/\r//;
    chomp;
    next if ($skip eq 9)
    $skip++;
}

Not sure if this works but I'm sure there's a more eloquent of doing it.

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1  
I can only assume that s/\r// is there because you have ␍␊ terminated lines. If that is the case you should open your file with the :crlf layer (open( my $fh, '<:crlf', 'file.txt') ) –  Brad Gilbert Apr 13 '13 at 6:17

1 Answer 1

You can use $.:

use strict; use warnings;
open(my $fh, '<', 'file.txt') or die $!;
while (<$fh>){
    next if $. == 9;
    $_=~ s/\r//;
    chomp;
    # process line
}

Can also use $fh->input_line_number()

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1  
okay so $. is a special variable that stores the current input line number of the last filehandle that was read. I just read that that from this SITE. I didn't know that until today. Thanks –  cooldood3490 Apr 3 '13 at 16:58
3  
@cooldood3490 The correct place to check is the documentation installed along with your perl: perldoc -v '$.' Current version of the documentation is available on perldoc.perl.org I would recommend staying away from web sites that spell the name of the language incorrectly. –  Sinan Ünür Apr 3 '13 at 17:12
    
Instead of $_=~ s/\r//;, write s/\r//. Better yet, write while (my $line = <$fh>) { $line =~ s/\s+\z//; }. –  Sinan Ünür Apr 3 '13 at 17:14
1  
You don't even have to use $. directly, you can use .. in scalar context. next if 9..9; If you need to skip more lines: next if 9..12; –  Brad Gilbert Apr 13 '13 at 6:08

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