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So, I feel lame for asking this, but I'm kinda stumped. I'm trying to get a list of file in a directory that end in tif ... only tif ... not tiff. So, I did this in C# ...

Directory.GetFiles(path, "*.tif", SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly);

I would expect it to only return tif files, but that is not the case. I get tiff as well. I would think that if I supplied the mask .tif? that would get me both, but not the mask .tif. I tried it at a command prompt as well and I am getting both as well in DOS. Am I missing something here? This just seems wrong to me. I guess I could sanitize the results afterwards, but if I don't have to that would be best.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

From MSDN:

When using the asterisk wildcard character in a searchPattern (for example, "*.txt"), the matching behavior varies depending on the length of the specified file extension. A searchPattern with a file extension of exactly three characters returns files with an extension of three or more characters, where the first three characters match the file extension specified in the searchPattern. A searchPattern with a file extension of one, two, or more than three characters returns only files with extensions of exactly that length that match the file extension specified in the searchPattern. When using the question mark wildcard character, this method returns only files that match the specified file extension. For example, given two files in a directory, "file1.txt" and "file1.txtother", a search pattern of "file?.txt" returns only the first file, while a search pattern of "file*.txt" returns both files.

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Sure enough. That is really screwy ... I think. Guess I'll just have to sanitize the results ... ugh! – Davin Studer Apr 3 '13 at 17:11

That's just how Directory.GetFiles works. From the manual:

When using the asterisk wildcard character in a searchPattern, such as "*.txt", the matching behavior when the extension is exactly three characters long is different than when the extension is more or less than three characters long. A searchPattern with a file extension of exactly three characters returns files having an extension of three or more characters, where the first three characters match the file extension specified in the searchPattern.

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Directory.GetFiles internally uses FindFirstFile function from Win32 API.

From the documentation of FindFirstFile:

• The search includes the long and short file names.

A file that has long file name of asd.tiff will have a short file name like asd~1.tif and this is why it shows up in the results.

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More than three character extensions are matched except when the path is on a network share (or mapped drive). For some reason the pattern only matches the long file name on remote drives.

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