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I'm using the Joda time to validate timestamp with time zone. When I passed invalid date or time it worked as expected. For example, when I pass 99 as seconds it gave the following error:

Exception in thread "main" org.joda.time.IllegalFieldValueException: Cannot  
parse "20131231235999+00": Value 99 for secondOfMinute must be in the range [0,59]

I was expecting it to throw a similar exception with I passed invalid time zone as well. I was expecting this for UTC offsets values less than -12 and greater than +14 hours (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_time_zones_by_UTC_offset). It did give the following error when the offset value exceed 23 hours.

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Invalid
format: "20131231235959+24" is malformed at "24"

I think I'm missing something since it indicates an error for 24th hour. Can someone explain why it allows offset values < -12 and > 14 hours.

Given below is a sample program with output for different offsets:

public static void main(String[] args) throws ParseException, DatatypeConfigurationException
{
    DateTimeFormatter dtf = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("yyyyMMddHHmmssZ").withZoneUTC();
    String dateString = "";

    for (int i = 0; i < 24; i++)
    {
        if (i < 10)
        {
            dateString = "20131231235959+0" + i;
            DateTime dt1 = dtf.parseDateTime(dateString);
            System.err.println(dateString + " = " + dt1);
        }
        else
        {
            dateString = "20131231235959+" + i;
            DateTime dt1 = dtf.parseDateTime(dateString);
            System.err.println(dateString + " = " + dt1);
        }
    }


    for (int i = 0; i < 24; i++)
    {
        if (i < 10)
        {
            dateString = "20131231235959-0" + i;
            DateTime dt1 = dtf.parseDateTime(dateString);
            System.err.println(dateString + " = " + dt1);
        }
        else
        {
            dateString = "20131231235959-" + i;
            DateTime dt1 = dtf.parseDateTime(dateString);
            System.err.println(dateString + " = " + dt1);
        }
    }
}

Output:

20131231235959+00 = 2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-00 = 2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+01 = 2013-12-31T22:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-01 = 2014-01-01T00:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+02 = 2013-12-31T21:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-02 = 2014-01-01T01:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+03 = 2013-12-31T20:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-03 = 2014-01-01T02:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+04 = 2013-12-31T19:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-04 = 2014-01-01T03:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+05 = 2013-12-31T18:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-05 = 2014-01-01T04:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+06 = 2013-12-31T17:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-06 = 2014-01-01T05:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+07 = 2013-12-31T16:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-07 = 2014-01-01T06:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+08 = 2013-12-31T15:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-08 = 2014-01-01T07:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+09 = 2013-12-31T14:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-09 = 2014-01-01T08:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+10 = 2013-12-31T13:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-10 = 2014-01-01T09:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+11 = 2013-12-31T12:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-11 = 2014-01-01T10:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+12 = 2013-12-31T11:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-12 = 2014-01-01T11:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+13 = 2013-12-31T10:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-13 = 2014-01-01T12:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+14 = 2013-12-31T09:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-14 = 2014-01-01T13:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+15 = 2013-12-31T08:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-15 = 2014-01-01T14:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+16 = 2013-12-31T07:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-16 = 2014-01-01T15:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+17 = 2013-12-31T06:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-17 = 2014-01-01T16:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+18 = 2013-12-31T05:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-18 = 2014-01-01T17:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+19 = 2013-12-31T04:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-19 = 2014-01-01T18:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+20 = 2013-12-31T03:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-20 = 2014-01-01T19:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+21 = 2013-12-31T02:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-21 = 2014-01-01T20:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+22 = 2013-12-31T01:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-22 = 2014-01-01T21:59:59.000Z
20131231235959+23 = 2013-12-31T00:59:59.000Z  20131231235959-23 = 2014-01-01T22:59:59.000Z

Thanks,

Anand

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I have a feeling it's related to a "just because this is the current range, it might not always be" mindset. Given that an absolute offset greater than 12 is already present, anything less than a full day is therefore valid. An absolute offset 24 or greater would be extremely bizarre, however (especially because that wouldn't necessarily be 'one full day'....) –  Clockwork-Muse Apr 3 '13 at 17:41

1 Answer 1

From ISO 8601 :

When it is required to indicate the difference between local time and UTC of day, the representation of the difference can be expressed in hours and minutes, or hours only. It shall be expressed as positive (i.e. with the leading plus sign [+]) if the local time is ahead of or equal to UTC of day and as negative (i.e. with the leading minus sign [-]) if it is behind UTC of day. The minutes time element of the difference may only be omitted if the difference between the time scales is exactly an integral number of hours. Basic format: ±hhmm Example: +0100 ±hh +01 Extended format: ±hh:mm Example: +01:00

It does not explicitly mention a range, but they do use the same letters as for hours. Given that joda time uses ISO 8601 by default it seems implied that the range for the offset is the same as the range for the hours value of a time representation.

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