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#! /bin/sh
a1=260
a2=9150
echo "$a1 * 100 / $a2" | bc

the output is

2

where it should be

2.8415

why is precision lost although I'm using bc?

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3 Answers 3

Try this (easy to re-use, you just need to remember to prepends the math expression with scale=N) :

$ echo "scale=10; $a1 * 100 / $a2" | bc
2.8415300546

As you can see, you can specify the scale length like you want.

See

man bc | less +/^' *scale \(\s*exp
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You can load the math library: bc -l

#! /bin/sh
a1=260
a2=9150
echo "$a1 * 100 / $a2" | bc -l

the output is

2.84153005464480874316
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You can use awk for better arithmetic:

awk -v a1=260 -v a2=9150 'BEGIN{printf("%.4f\n", (a1 * 100 / a2))}' 

output: 2.8415

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3  
in what way is it better it looks more complicated –  user568109 Apr 3 '13 at 17:45
    
@user568109: I just meant awk provides better arithmetic capabilities than standard bash btw which part is looking complicated to you? –  anubhava Apr 3 '13 at 17:58
1  
you can do it with bc easily and OP did not ask for awk –  user568109 Apr 3 '13 at 18:01
    
bc is designed especially for math, I don't see any relevant point where awk will be better, and moreover, he uses already bc –  sputnick Apr 3 '13 at 18:01
    
@user568109 Where exactly did I say that awk is better than bc I just presented another option to perform floating point arithmetic not available in standard bash (bc is a an external tool as well). –  anubhava Apr 3 '13 at 18:04

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