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I was wondering why this while loop doesn't allow my program to terminate?

As I understand (though I could well be wrong) the condition while (cin >> line) checks my input stream for a String and then runs my loop until there is no other String found in the input. However after testing my code I get the correct output but my loop never terminates any idea as to why?

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <cctype>

using namespace std;

int main() {

string roman_digits[] = {"", "I", "II", "III", "IV", "V", "VI", "VII", "VIII", "IX"};
string roman_tens  [] = {"", "X", "XX", "XXX", "XL", "L", "LX", "LXX", "LXXX", "XC"};
string roman_hundreds [] = {"", "C", "CC", "CCC", "CD", "D", "DC", "DCC", "DCCC", "CM"};
string roman_thousands [] = {"", "M","MM", "MMM"};
string line;
char c;


cout << "Type in a Roman numeral: ";

// Loops through inputted Roman Numerals.    
while (cin >> line){
    int i = 0;

    // Loops through a Roman numeral and changes it to uppercase.
    while(line[i]){
        c = line[i];
        c = (toupper(c));
        line[i] = c;
        i++;
    }


// Loops through checking roman numeral with the thousands array and if there is a match prints out the equivalent arabic number.
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++){
       if (roman_thousands[i] == line){
           cout << "The Arabic equivalent of " 
                << line <<" is: " << i << 0 << 0 << 0 << endl;
        }
    }
 // Loops through checking roman numeral with the hundreds array and if there is a match prints out the equivalent arabic number.
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++){
        if (roman_hundreds[i] == line){
            cout << "The Arabic equivalent of " << line << " is: " << i << 0 << 0 << endl;
        }
    }
     // Loops through checking roman numeral with the tens array and if there is a match prints out the equivalent arabic number.
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++){
        if (roman_tens[i] == line){
            cout << "The Arabic equivalent of " << line << " is: " << i << 0 << endl;
        }
    }
     // Loops through checking roman numeral with the digits array and if there is a match prints out the equivalent arabic number.
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++){
        if (roman_digits[i] == line){
            cout << "The Arabic equivalent of " << line << " is: " << i << endl;
        }

    }
 }


  return 0;


}
share|improve this question
    
"However after testing my code I get the correct output but my loop never terminates" -- how did you test your code? –  Arun Apr 3 '13 at 18:08
4  
Did you send an EOF (CtrlZ, CtrlD, etc. depending on your terminal and platform) to stdin ? –  WhozCraig Apr 3 '13 at 18:08
    

3 Answers 3

The program always waits for you to add more input, so it won't terminate. There are a few ways around this:

  • Have the program look for a specific keyword like "quit" or "exit" or even just a blank space, and type that to terminate. This is very simple, but not very elegant.
  • Send an "end of stream" indicator as the only thing in your input. In linux and unix, you can just type Ctrl-D, and this will indicate that you've closed standard input. As some of the comments say, Ctrl-Z is the end of file specifier for Windows, if you're using that.
share|improve this answer

Your program never ends because your outer loop runs forever.

Possible fix:

while (cin >> line) 
{
   int i = 0;
   if (line == "quit") break;

   while(line[i])
   {
     c = line[i];
     c = (toupper(c));
     line[i] = c;
     i++;
   }
   // run for loops
}

then you are going to have to call all of those for loops. Probably best to put them in a function.

share|improve this answer
    
there is nothing wrong in the code. Using Ctrl+d is a clean way to exit from a command line. –  Ruggero Turra Apr 3 '13 at 18:20
    
@wiso: That's one way. –  user195488 Apr 3 '13 at 18:47

Your program exhibits undefined behavior because it reads past the end of the array in this loop:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++){
   if (roman_thousands[i] == line){
       cout << "The Arabic equivalent of " 
            << line <<" is: " << i << 0 << 0 << 0 << endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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